Fishing Reynolds Pond

I decided to try extra hard to catch a redear sunfish and I figured that the right place to do so was in Reynolds Pond, a shallow warmwater fishery about ten miles west of Bend.

The pond is listed in some fishing guides as being 20 acres in size, but I am fairly certain that it is no more than half that. However, the several small islands in the pond give it significantly more shoreline to fish.

As usual, the few times I have fished the pond, I first stopped at the Alfalfa Store to get directions to the pond. The store has, on their own, created a map to help anglers wanting to fish the pond, that they are able to find it.

On my previous trip to Reynolds, I found Glenn, the store owner, to be most helpful. I was saddened to learn that Glen was no longer with us, but his son, Justin, did a great job of making sure I was going to be able to find the pond – even producing the same map that his father had showed me.

And so I soon found myself at the pond and tried a few casts from shore before I launched my polyethylene float tube-like fishing device called a “River Rat”. I managed to quickly catch a couple of small bass underneath the small primitive “footbridge”. I also saw a couple of ten-inch bullheads in water less than a foot deep, but spooked them even though I cast well away from them.

And then I was in my River Rat and serious about catching a redear sunfish as well as largemouth bass and black crappie. But the fishing was slow for everything but very small bass. When I approached the spot where I caught a ten inch crappie on my previous trip, I started using Berkley 1.5-inch fliptail grubs and soon had several more crappies. However, they only averaged about six inches in length.

As soon as I found some substantial shallow water shaded areas, I switched over to a Zoom fluke and in quick order I had a couple of three pound largemouth bass. They found incredibly well and I hoped they were pond-reared fish and not recent transplants from Davis Lake.

I never encountered any redear sunfish and I paid close attention to any spot that looked like a spawning area. On my first trip to Reynolds, a man walking his dog had stated that he was amazed by how many jumbo sunfish were laying on the bank dead. They were gone by the time I was there, but I did notice a number of brown bullheads that had recently died.

It now seems that, what I had hoped to be was a regular die off of redears after spawning, might have instead been a more serious, more permanent dieoff. Area ODFW biologists believe that there are still a few redears present in Reynolds Pond, but I am certain that if that is the case, the population is very, very low.

In the meantime, I caught another nice largemouth weighing two and a half pounds and ended up with about 20 crappie and whether, or not, there are any redear sunfish left in the pond, the bass and crappie fishing is very good. I think that next year, and especially the year after, are going to be stellar crappie years.

I am also going to make an effort to fish Reynolds when the largemouth are in the prespawn mode when larger fish should be available in the shallows. According to Justin, a friend of his caught bass to six pounds earlier this spring.

The Alfalfa Store is an ideal spot to get supplies and fishing information on fishing Reynolds Pond.

The Alfalfa Store is an ideal spot to get supplies and fishing information on fishing Reynolds Pond.

Justin Green shows off the map they made to make it easier to find Reynolds Pond. On my first trip to Reynolds, his father Glenn showed me how to get to the pond and Justin does a good job of carrying on the tradition.

Justin Green shows off the map they made to make it easier to find Reynolds Pond. On my first trip to Reynolds, his father Glenn showed me how to get to the pond and Justin does a good job of carrying on the tradition.

Although Reynolds Pond, in some fishing guides, is said to have 20 surface acres, it is actually much smaller than that. However, there are several small islands in the lake that increase the shoreline considerably.

Although Reynolds Pond, in some fishing guides, is said to have 20 surface acres, it is actually much smaller than that. However, there are several small islands in the lake that increase the shoreline considerably.

This largemouth bass weighed three pounds and put up a spectacular battle - clearing the surface by a full three feet on one leap. I really wish I could figure out a way to do a fish “justice” when holding it up from a float tube.

This largemouth bass weighed three pounds and put up a spectacular battle – clearing the surface by a full three feet on one leap. I really wish I could figure out a way to do a fish “justice” when holding it up from a float tube.

The crappie didn’t average very big. This one was typical. The most exciting thing was knocking my fishing rod into the water and reaching for it only to discover that I was holding my camera in my hand. It took most of a day, but I was able to salvage the photos and my camera.

The crappie didn’t average very big. This one was typical. The most exciting thing was knocking my fishing rod into the water and reaching for it only to discover that I was holding my camera in my hand. It took most of a day, but I was able to salvage the photos and my camera.

About Pete Heley

Writes and self-publishes Oregon and Washington fishing books.
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