Monthly Archives: July 2019

WDFW News – Neah Bay Update.

Anglers must release Chinook in Neah Bay beginning Sunday, July 14

Action: Closes Chinook retention.

Effective date: July 14, 2019.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Location: Marine Area 4.

Reason for action: Catch Area 4 is expected to reach its Chinook guideline at current catch rates, which would require closure of the fishery in the area; this rule should extend the fishing season to provide opportunity to access harvestable coho in the area.

Additional information: Waters of Marine Area 4 east of a true north-south line through Sail Rock are closed. The daily limit for salmon in Neah Bay remains at two salmon.

Anglers are reminded to always check for emergency rule changes prior to fishing. Rule changes can be found on the website at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/ or by calling the fishing hotline at 360-902-2500.

Information contact: Region 6 office, 360-249-4628

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Halibut Update

Columbia River Subarea

All-Depth—Closed for remainder of the year.

Nearshore—the nearshore fishery is open seven days per week. There have been no landings in the Columbia River Subarea nearshore fishery yet. Quota = 500 lbs.

Central Oregon Coast Subarea

Spring All-Depth season— through the July 4-6 opener the total landings are 88,354 pounds (21,147 pounds landed during the last opening). This leaves 82,749 pounds or 48% of the spring all-depth quota remaining. The last set of open dates are July 18-20, any quota remaining after those days will be transferred to the summer all-depth or nearshore fishery.

The weather last opening was the best since the first opening. Coastwide the average size was 27 pounds round weight last week, the highest for any opening so far this year.

Summer All-Depth Season—opens August 2-3, if quota remaining, can be open every other Friday and Saturday. Quota = 67,898 lbs.

Nearshore Season— opened June 1, seven days per week. There has been 5,419 pounds landed so far, leaving 27,172 pounds (83.4%) of the quota remaining. Average weight last week was approximately 40 pounds round weight, this is the highest weekly avg weight for any area or fishery so far in 2019. Reminder that on days when the all-depth fishery is also open, such as July 18-20, the all-depth fishery regulations apply, regardless of what depth is fished. This means that most bottomfish species may not be retained when halibut are onboard the vessel.

South of Humbug Mountain subarea—there has been a total of 1,169 pounds landed, 79 pounds landed last week. This leaves 10,153 pounds (90%) of the quota remaining.

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Mardon Resort / Potholes Reservoir Fishing Report.

The current water level on the Potholes Reservoir is 1039.66 feet – down 1.08 feet from last week and down just over six feet from the high water mark this year. The water temps in the sand dunes are in the mid – 70’s to upper 70’s. The water temps on the main Reservoir are in mid to upper-70 as well.
The sand dunes continue to be very good for Largemouth bass! Results of the Limit Out Performance Marine Potholes Shootout tournament show that the Potholes Reservoir is extremely healthy. Congratulations to Levi and Mason Meseberg for making the Top Ten cut on Day 1 and winning it on Day Two. The father son team caught weighed over 18 pounds each day to take first place. Fish the sand dunes with ½ oz jigs and craw trailers, Swim Jigs, Senkos and frogs. The Smallmouth have moved out of the dunes and anglers are finding them on the face of the dam and on the rock piles around Goose Island. Fish Booyah finesse jigs, Wacky Rigged Senkos, Crankbaits, Tubes and DS Minnows for the Smallmouth.
The walleye fishing has been spotty and tough this week. The walleye have spread out and are still in and around the weed beds. Keep at least one rod as close to the weeds as you can – even if it means cleaning weeds off here and there. Fish the West Arm, Crab Creek and the Lind Coulee in 6-20 feet of water. Troll the channels and weed lines with Smile Blades/Slow Death Hooks/2 oz bottom walker and ½ a crawler in 8-15 feet. Troll from .8-1.2 miles per hour. The crankbait bite is picking up as the water is dropping over a foot per week. Troll a #5 Flicker Shad or Rapala Shad Rap in the channels and next to the weed beds at 1.5 – 2.5 miles per hour.
The trout fishing has been fair this week. Fish in front of Medicare Beach to the Mouth of Crab Creek and in front of the State Park. Troll Wicked Lures Trout Killers, Needlefish spoons, #7 Flicker Shads and Shad Raps at 2.0-3.0 mph. Set the drag fairly light as the average trout is 2-5 pounds and can break the line on the initial strike.
The Channel Cat and Bullhead fishing is heating up with the warm water temps! Fish the sand dunes with Catfish Magic Bait, Berkley Catfish Nuggets, and worms on the bottom. Fish in up Lind Coulee, the mouth of Frenchman’s Wasteway and in the sand dunes for Channel Cats and Bullhead.
Crappie and Bluegill are fishing is picking up back in the sand dunes and up in Lind Coulee. Fish Gulp alive minnows, Trout Magnets, #5 Flicker Shads and Bobby Garland Baby Shads around the willows for panfish.
Call the MarDon Tackle Store for the latest fishing info at 509-346-2651.

Mason Meseberg and Russ Baker show four of five of Levi and Mason Meseberg’s winning fish – Mason landed a 5.04 Largemouth as part of their winning Day 2 weight of 18.42 pounds – awesome job!

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Pete Heley Outdoors 7 / 11 / 2019

Some striper anglers fishing shallow-running swimbaits averaged at least 15 stripers per night last week. It seems that most of the larger stripers landed recently have been caught on live bait with live sardines from Umpqua Bait, “pogies and pike minnows all working.

It’s kind of ironic that the most successful striper anglers eight to ten years ago are having the toughest time catching stripers now.

The run of redtail surfperch in the lower Umpqua River is still going strong, but seems to becoming increasingly inconsistent.

Fishing local beaches for “pinkfins” has been surprisingly tough the last two weeks.

The Coquille River is still producing striped bass and usually has a decent bite the last three hours of daylight. Striper fishing on the Smith River continues to be a night fishery.

Recently. some of the best striperfishing on the Coquille riverhas been occurringbetween Riverton and Bullards Bar State Park. Striper fishing has dominated fishing activity to the point where every other fish species is underfished.

Fishing pressure directed towars smallmouth bass increased last week. Most of the recent smallmouth catches have occurred in the Myrtle Point- Arago area as well as the lower reaches of the South Fork Coquille.

A few anglers fishing out of float tubes have made good batches of crappies, bluegills and largemouth bass from Fat Elk Slough just below Highway 42.

Because of the BLM Campground closure, fishing pressure on Loon Lake is way down and fishing for largemouth bass and bluegills has been good. Fishing for brown bullhead catfish and black crappies has been fair.

The Fishing Dock in Tugman Park is producing black crappie – but most anglers aren’t fishing deep enough.

The halibut update for the Central Oregon Coast Subarea is out and is as follows.

Spring All-Depth season— through the June 20-22 opener, the total landings are 67,207 pounds (near 7,000 pounds landed during the last opening). This leaves 103,896 pounds or 61% of the spring all-depth quota remaining. Given that amount of quota remaining, the back-up dates of July 4-6 and July 18-20 will be open for all-depth halibut.

The average size for the Central Coast all-depth fishery remains around 22-23 pounds round weight per fish, with last week’s average marking a new high for this season at around 26 pounds round weight.

Summer All-Depth Season—opens August 2-3, if quota remaining, can be open every other Friday and Saturday. Quota = 67,898 lbs.

Nearshore Season— opened June 1, seven days per week. There has been 2,023 pounds landed so far, leaving 30,568 pounds (94%) of the quota remaining. Average weight last week was approximately 23 pounds round weight.

Reminder that on days when the all-depth fishery is also open, such as July 4-6 & July 18-20, the all-depth fishery regulations apply, regardless of what depth is fished. This means that most bottomfish species may not be retained when halibut are onboard the vessel.

South of Humbug Mountain subarea—there has been a total of 669 pounds landed. This leaves 10,737 pounds (94.8 %) of the quota remaining.

Guides fishing the ocean out of Winchester Bay have generally been pleased with their catch results. A few chinook salmon have been caught northward of the Umpqua River Bar.

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CDCDFW News – CDFW Warns Anglers and Hunters about Bogus License Sales Websites.

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) has been made aware of several websites that improperly charge customers extra fees for online fishing and hunting license purchases and collect sensitive personal information as part of their unauthorized transactions.

California hunting and fishing licenses may properly be purchased in only one of four ways:
Through a CDFW license sales office,
Through an independent license sales agent authorized by CDFW (such as a local sporting goods store, large discount store, or a bait and tackle shop),
Online through CDFW’s Automated License Data System (ALDS), or
Over the telephone through CDFW’s authorized Telephone Sales agent. Telephone Sales can be reached at (800) 565-1458.
The ALDS, which is CDFW’s exclusive means of online license sales, was launched in 2011. ALDS can be accessed via CDFW’s website or by clicking the link that is frequently provided in official communications from the department. When making an online purchase, please check the URL of the site you are visiting to ensure you are on the official CDFW website (www.wildlife.ca.gov) or the ALDS website (www.ca.wildlifelicense.com/internetsales). These are the only CDFW-affiliated links for hunting and fishing license sales.

Customers should be aware that there are many unofficial websites that attempt to represent the CDFW and/or contain information about hunting and fishing licenses, and Internet search engines may not always list the official CDFW website as the top result.

Please be cautious when providing personal information to any website. While authorized purchases made through independent license sales agents and ALDS are subject to an additional 5 percent handling fee, the fraudulent sales websites offer products for sale with “shipping and handling fees” that are much higher than 5 percent of the base purchase price. To date, it appears that the fraudulent activity has been limited to charging customers unauthorized fees. Licenses that have been mailed to customers after unauthorized transactions may be valid; however, CDFW cannot guarantee that this is or will be true in all cases.

If you believe you may have been defrauded by an unauthorized website or would like to check the validity of a previous purchase, please provide us with information about your experience at vog.ac.efildliwnull@duarFtropeR.

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When Politicians Pretend to be Outdoor Sportsmen.

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Ocean Salmon Update.

Data regarding the current ocean selective(finclipped) coho season has been updated through June 30th and 4.4 percent of the quota has been caught and kept with fishing success running at .61 retained salmon per angler/trip. The most successful port so far has been Winchester Bay with 1.02 kept salmon per angler trip.

By far the busiest port has been Newport with 2,094 angler/trips. Garibaldi has been the second busiest salmon fishing port with 1,535 angler trips and Winchester Bay has been the third busiest with 1,075 angler/trips.

The updated resuls for all ten ports in our zone are: Garibaldi(1,535 angler trips – .24 retained salmon per angler); Pacific City(871 angler/trips -.45 retained salmon per angler); Depoe Bay(872 angler trips – .71 retained salmon per angler); Newport(2,094 angler trips – .83 retained salmon per angler); Florence(0 angler/trips); Brookings(869 angler/trips – .30 retained salmon per angler); Gold Beach(32 angler/trips – .00 retained salmon per angler); Bandon(24 angler/trips – .63 retained salmon per angler): Charleston(315 angler/trips – .76 retained salmon per angler);

As for chinook salmon catches, Newport leads with 282, followed by Depoe Bay with 137 and Brookings with 126.

For the first time in several years, Brookings has produced more retained coho salmon than chinooks – leading some to believe that northern California will not contribute, to the usual degree, to our ocean salmon fishery along the southern Oregon coast.

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Lunker Striped Bass – Stockade Market

Although the striped bass fishing is much improved, the heaviest striper weighed in at the Stockade Market in Winchester Bay remains a 50-inch 45 pound lunker caught by Ted Armstrong taken while fishing herring at night on Smith River.

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CDFW News – Deadly Bat Fungus Detected in California.

The fungus that causes White-nose Syndrome (WNS), a deadly disease of bats, has been detected in low levels in California for the first time. Fungal DNA of Pseudogymnoascus destructans (Pd) was detected in samples collected this spring from bats on private land in the Plumas County town of Chester. The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) have been preparing for possible detection of the fungus with partner organizations since 2009. While there is currently no indication the disease itself is affecting bat populations in California, the lab tests suggest Pd is here.

WNS awakens bats during hibernation, causing them to use energy reserves needed to survive winter, when insects they rely upon for food are not available. The fungus was first detected in New York in 2006 and spread incrementally. Bats that have contracted the diseasehave now been confirmed in 33 states and seven Canadian provinces. Including the recent California discovery, the fungus alone has now been detected in a total of five states.

WNS has killed millions of bats in the U.S., including more than 90 percent of the bats in some hibernation colonies. Since bats usually produce only one offspring per year, it could take decades for some populations to recover from a major die-off.

“WNS is considered one of the deadliest wildlife diseases, having killed over six million North American bats since it was discovered,” said CDFW Wildlife Veterinarian and Epidemiologist Dr. Deana Clifford. “WNS doesn’t affect human health or pets, but the ecological impacts of bat die-offs may indirectly impact agricultural systems through loss of the natural pesticide effect and nutrient cycling of bats.”

Until spring 2016, the westernmost occurrence of Pd was in eastern Nebraska. In March of that year WNS was confirmed in Washington State-1,300 miles west of the nearest known location of the fungus. How it got there is unknown; Pd spreads through physical contact with an infected bat or Pd in the environment. Because spores are persistent, people can also spread the fungus from infected areas to non-infected areas on their shoes, clothes or gear.

Surveillance for WNS has been supported by a national program administered by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Wildlife Health Center in Wisconsin in collaboration with FWS, Northern Arizona University (NAU), and Bat Conservation International (BCI). CDFW has worked with the National Park Service Klamath Network (NPS KLMN) and others to collect swab samples from bats around California since 2016. The samples tested for the DNA signature of Pd were negative until 2018, when one sample from a little brown bat maternity colony in Chester suggested the fungus may be present at low levels. In 2019, the same site and another in Chester yielded three bats with similar low-level detections.

Dr. Alice Chung-MacCoubrey of the NPS KLMN, who led the surveillance work at Chester and several other northern California sites, said, “The detection of Pd at Chester, even at these low levels, is troubling. It has now been detected in two successive years at two different sites and with testing by both the NWHC lab and the NAU lab. In other parts of North America affected by WNS, low-level Pd detections preceded detection of the disease itself by one to four years.”

“Detection of Pd at the levels reported in Chester are possible thanks to advanced tools and surveillance networks in place today that we did not have in the years right after WNS was discovered,” said Jeremy Coleman, National White-nose Syndrome coordinator for the FWS, which leads the national response to the disease. “These very early indications that Pd is present allow for a more proactive response by local partners than what has been possible before. Just how long we’ll have before WNS emerges in California’s bats is a big unknown.”

CDFW leads the California WNS Steering Committee, a multi-agency scientific research group that has been monitoring WNS nationally since 2009. The Committee includes the FWS, NPS, U.S. Forest Service, USGS, BCI, California State Parks, U.S. Department of Defense and National Speleological Society (NSS). They developed a WNS response plan for California that outlines actions to be taken if the fungus or disease arrives in California.

“It is critically important for CDFW and our partners to follow up on these detections,” said CDFW Wildlife Ecologist Dr. Scott Osborn. “In the coming months and years, we will intensify surveillance for WNS, monitor impacts on bat populations, and assist with research on disease management. We hope disease treatment and prevention techniques currently in development will be available soon.”

Meanwhile, Osborn asks all Californians to be vigilant and cooperate with management actions that may be taken to slow the spread of WNS. People can assist with surveillance by reporting unusual behavior they see in bats. Sick or dying bats observed during winter in the colder regions of the state should be reported to CDFW at www.wildlife.ca.gov/conservation/laboratories/wildlife-investigations/monitoring/wns/report.

According to Osborn, caving organizations like the NSS have helped collect important information about California’s underground bat roosts. People who enter caves and mines should follow decontamination protocols at www.whitenosesyndrome.org/static-page/decontamination-information, and do not transfer clothing or gear between certain sites.

Details about WNS and Pd are at www.whitenosesyndrome.org.
For photos and B-roll video, visit the White-nose Syndrome National Response Team newsroom at www.whitenosesyndrome.org/static-page/news.
Information about bat conservation is available at www.batcon.org.

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Mardon Resort / Potholes Reservoir Fishing Report

The current water level on the Potholes Reservoir is 1040.74 feet – down .80 feet from last week and down just over 5 feet from the high water mark this year. The water temps in the sand dunes are in the mid- 70’s. The water temps on the main Reservoir are in mid-70’s as well.
The sand dunes continue to be good for Largemouth bass. Fish the sand dunes with ½ oz jigs and craw trailers, Swim Jigs, Senkos and frogs. The Strike King Rage Swimm’R has been producing well. The Smallmouth seemed to have moved out of the dunes and anglers are finding them on the face of the dam and on the rock piles around Goose Island. Fish Booyah finesse jigs, Wacky Rigged Senkos, Crankbaits, Tubes and Swimbaits for the Smallmouth.
The walleye fishing continues to be a little spotty this week. The walleye have spread out and are still in and around the weed beds. Keep at least one rod as close to the weeds as you can – even if it means cleaning weeds off here and there. Fish the West Arm, Crab Creek and the Lind Coulee in 6-20 feet of water. Troll the channels and weed lines with Smile Blades/Slow Death Hooks/2 oz bottom walker and ½ a crawler in 8-15 feet. Troll from .8-1.2 miles per hour. The crankbait bite should pick as the water drops. Troll a #5 Flicker Shad or Rapala Shad Rap in the channels and next to the weed beds at 2-3 miles per hour.
The trout fishing picked up this week with more anglers reporting catches of trout in the 16-24” range. Fish in front of Medicare Beach to the Mouth of Crab Creek and in front of the State Park. Troll Wicked Lures Trout Killers, Needlefish spoons, #7 Flicker Shads and Shad Raps.
Crappie and Bluegill are fishing is picking up back in the sand dunes and up in Lind Coulee. Fish Gulp alive minnows, Trout Magnets, #5 Flicker Shads and Bobby Garland Baby Shads around the willows for panfish.
Call the MarDon Tackle Store for the latest fishing info at 509-346-2651

Tom Eisenberg chose to spend his 80th birthday fishing at MarDon Resort with his family, including his two granddaughters – Kate and Nicole from Maui, Hawaii. One had never fished before at all – and each ended up catching 2 trout each – all over 3-pounds! Awesome job girls!.

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