Monthly Archives: July 2019

Mardon Resort / Potholes Reservoir Fishing Report

MarDon Fresh News – July 25, 2019
The current water level on the Potholes Reservoir is 1036.95 feet – down 1.45 feet from one week ago. The water temps in the sand dunes are in the mid 70’s to low 80’s. The water temps on the main Reservoir are in the mid to upper-70.
The sand dunes continue to be produce quality Largemouth and Smallmouth bass! Fish the sand dunes and Crab Creek with 3/8th oz. swim jigs, Senkos, Strike King Cutt’R worms and SPRO frogs. Some good bass are being caught on the face of the sand dunes deeper. The Smallmouth bass are being found on the face of the dam and on the rock piles around Goose Island. Fish Booyah finesse jigs, Wacky Rigged Senkos, Crankbaits, Tubes and DS Minnows for the Smallmouth.
The walleye fishing remains fair. The walleye have spread out and are still in and around the weed beds. Keep at least one rod as close to the weeds as you can – even if it means cleaning weeds off here and there. Fish the West Arm and Crab Creek in 6-20 feet of water. Troll the channels and weed lines with a Slow Death Hook and a 2 oz. bottom walker and ½ a crawler in 8-15 feet. Troll from .8-1.2 miles per hour. The crankbait bite is picking up as the water is dropping over a foot per week. Troll a #5 Flicker Shad or Rapala Shad Rap in the channels and next to the weed beds at 1.5 – 2.5 miles per hour. Now is a good time to jig or drop-shot the weed-lines as well.
The trout fishing has been fair again this week. Fish in front of Medicare Beach to the Mouth of Crab Creek and in front of the State Park. Troll Wicked Lures Trout Killers, Needlefish spoons, #7 Flicker Shads and Shad Raps at 2.0-3.0 mph. Set the drag fairly light as the average trout is 2-5 pounds and can break the line on the initial strike.
The Channel Cat and Bullhead fishing continues to very productive this week. Use Catfish Magic Bait, Berkley Catfish Nuggets, and worms on the bottom for both. Fish up Lind Coulee, the mouth of Frenchman’s Wasteway and in the sand dunes for Channel Cats and Bullhead.
The Crappie and Bluegill fishing has been very good up Crab Creek and along the face of the sand dunes. The fishing continues to impr

Wyatt Smith of Moses Lake – with a big Potholes Reservoir Walleye – caught while chasing Largemouth bass!

ove as the water drops – setting up some amazing panfish fishing in August and September. Fish – Gulp Alive minnows, Trout Magnets, #5 Flicker Shads and Bobby Garland Baby Shads around the willows & weed-lines for Crappie, Bluegill and Perch
Call the MarDon Tackle Store for the latest fishing info at 509-346-2651

Brandon Palaniuk from Hayden, ID has earned two Bassmaster Elite Series wins and has qualified for six Bassmaster Classics as well as fishing the 2019 Major League Fishing Tour enjoying a day of fishing on the Potholes Reservoir!

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CDFW News – CDFW Offers Wildlife Friendly Tips for Cannabis Cultivators

Below are suggestions for utilizing natural resources and coexisting with wildlife:

Post Bat Boxes – Bats eat millions of insects each night and can help control pesky insect populations, reducing the need for harmful pesticides. To encourage bats on your property, install bat boxes. These are artificial roosts that allows bats to live in an area with otherwise limited roosting habitat. To learn more about utilizing bat boxes visit: https://batworld.org/bat-house-information/.

Post Owl Boxes – Similar to bat boxes, providing owl boxes on your property can encourage these handy raptors to help control rodent populations. Reliance on harmful rodenticides which impact the entire food chain (including mountain lions) can be significantly reduced when you let owls do the work for you. Learn more at: www.ucdavis.edu/one-health/how-build-owl-box/.

Location Selection – Location is everything for a business and commercial cannabis cultivation is no exception. To reduce impacts to sensitive habitats and avoid engaging in take of listed species during cultivation or construction activities, research your location thoroughly. Some parcels are better suited for farming activities as compared to other locations near sensitive streams or with listed species on or near the property. Your regional CDFW representative can provide feedback on your proposed cultivation site and how to address potential impacts to fish and wildlife resources.

Employ Companion Planting – Some plant species naturally repel pests. By planting these types of crops adjacent to cannabis, you will have another ‘natural’ insecticide and can be less reliant on the more toxic alternatives that often move from points of application through spray drift, surface runoff or irrigation return flows.

Use Natural Vegetation – Retaining natural vegetation around the property will result in a more diverse landscape with more food resources, nest sites, and shelter for bird species that forage on insects and predators that prey on small mammals. The natural vegetation will also help animals to move around without being seen or disrupted by interactions with people.

Choose the Right Crop for the Right Climate – To reduce water use during the hot summer months, cannabis cultivators can choose a cannabis strain that is best suited for the climate in which it is being produced. The right strain, for the right location, in the right amount is a win-win for all. This will help produce a plant with better yields that is more environmentally friendly.

If you are a cannabis cultivator and have ideas for helping native wildlife or have questions about the suggestions, please email vog.ac.efildliwnull@sibannaCksA. For more information on upcoming permitting workshops, please visit www.wildlife.ca.gov/cannabis and click on the events tab.

CDFW encourages cannabis cultivators to obtain a state license with the California Department of Food and Agriculture (which includes notifying CDFW about any proposed activities), a county permit, permits from the State Water Boards and implementing best management practices to reduce environmental impacts.

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WDFW News –

Action: Open additional harvest opportunity for white sturgeon in Lake Roosevelt.

Species affected: White sturgeon

Locations and effective dates:

1) Lake Roosevelt, from Grand Coulee Dam to China Bend Boat Ramp (including the Spokane River from Highway 25 Bridge upstream to 400’ below Little Falls Dam, Colville River upstream to Meyers Falls and the Kettle River upstream to Barstow Bridge). Remains open seven days per week through Sept. 30, 2019.

2) Lake Roosevelt, from China Bend Boat Ramp upstream to the Canadian Border. Open seven days per week from Sept. 1 through Sept. 30, 2019.

Reason for action: The portion of Lake Roosevelt from China Bend upstream to the Canadian border is managed as a spawning sanctuary for white sturgeon. Spawning is expected to continue into August. In order to reduce the potential for impacts to wild adult sturgeon spawners, the opening of that portion of the reservoir to sturgeon fishing will be Sept. 1.

Sturgeon fishery rules: Daily limit 1 sturgeon. Annual limit 2 sturgeon. It is legal to retain sturgeon between 53 inches and 63 inches fork length. Fork length is measured from the tip of the snout to middle of the fork in the caudal fin (tail). Closed to night fishing. Two-pole fishing is allowed with a two-pole endorsement. Harvested sturgeon must be recorded on a Catch Record Card (Catch Code 549). Anglers may continue to catch and release sturgeon after the daily limit and annual limit have been taken. All other statewide rules for sturgeon must be observed.

Anglers are asked to use heavy gear (minimum 50lb test mainline and leader) with 14/0 hooks or smaller to avoid injuring large, wild adult sturgeon. This will ensure anglers hook and land sturgeon effectively, but also protects large, wild adult brood sturgeon, that if hooked, should be played to hand quickly. It is unlawful to remove oversized sturgeon from the water. WDFW recommends that any fish that will not be retained should not be removed from the water prior to release.

Additional information: The Lake Roosevelt co-managers (WDFW, Spokane Tribe and the Colville Confederated Tribes) will all be conducting sturgeon fisheries at this time. Anglers are asked to be respectful of tribal angling and both tribal and non-tribal sturgeon research that is occurring on the reservoir. Anglers are reminded that fishery dates, times, slot limits, daily limits and annual limits may be adjusted over time to ensure a sustainable population of sturgeon is maintained in Lake Roosevelt and that equitable access to the fishery amongst the three co-managers is achieved.

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WDFW News – Chinook salmon fishing opens on Columbia River above Brewster.

Action: Opens Chinook salmon fishing season in a section of the Columbia River above the Highway 173 Bridge at Brewster.

Effective date: Aug. 1, 2019 until further notice.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Location: Columbia River: From the Highway 173 Bridge at Brewster upstream to the Highway 17 Bridge near Bridgeport.

Reason for action: Returns of hatchery summer Chinook above Wells Dam are sufficient to allow for recreational harvest.

Additional information: Min. length 12”. Daily limit 6 Chinook salmon. No more than 2 hatchery adult Chinook may be retained as part of the daily limit. Release wild adult Chinook, all sockeye, and all coho. Use of barbless hooks is voluntary. Anglers may fish with two poles with a valid Two-pole Endorsement.

WDFW will be monitoring harvest and may close this season early if necessary. For emergency rule updates, please visit https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/.

Colville Confederated Tribes will be purse seining to collect salmon for broodstock and ceremonial and subsistence purposes. Anglers are asked to be respectful of these activities conducted by the tribe. The Chief Joseph Hatchery releases millions of Chinook that contribute to recreational fisheries in the Columbia River.

Information contact: Ryan Fortier, District 6 Fish Biologist, (509) 997-0316 or Chad Jackson, Region 2 Fish Program Manager, (509) 754-4624, ext 250

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WDFW News – State invests $25 million in removing barriers to migrating fish.

– Migrating fish will soon have access to more than 82 miles of streams in Washington, thanks to $25 million in grants from the Brian Abbott Fish Barrier Removal Board.

The board will fund more than 50 projects in 20 counties to remove fish passage barriers that block salmon and steelhead from swimming upstream to their spawning areas. The most common barriers to fish passage are culverts, which are large pipes or other structures that carry streams under roads. Culverts can be too high for fish to reach, too small to handle high water flows, or too steep for fish to navigate.

“These projects build on previous fish passage investments by the Washington State Department of Transportation, forest land owners, and local governments,” said Tom Jameson, WDFW fish passage manager and chair of the Brian Abbott Fish Barrier Removal Board. “We’re excited that several projects will focus on watersheds that are particularly good habitat for chinook salmon, which are the main food source for southern resident killer whales (orcas). We appreciate the Legislature’s support so we can continue contributing to salmon and orca recovery.”

Created by the Legislature in 2014, the Brian Abbott Fish Barrier Removal Board coordinates the removal of fish passage barriers on state, local, tribal, and private land that block salmon and steelhead access to prime spawning and rearing habitat. Funding comes from the sale of state bonds.

“This board represents an incredible partnership that ultimately helps us open entire watersheds where we can make the biggest impact for fish,” said Kaleen Cottingham, director of the Recreation and Conservation Office, which administers the grants. “A coordinated approach is key to helping fish reach the ocean, return home to spawn, and get to healthy habitats to feed, grow, and transition from saltwater to freshwater.”

Selected projects went through a technical review committee, which evaluated project proposals based on their coordination with nearby fish passage projects, benefit to salmon and steelhead populations listed as threatened or endangered under the federal Endangered Species Act, and cost-effectiveness. The committee also evaluated projects based on the severity of the barrier and its location in the watershed, prioritizing downstream barriers first.

The grant program is administered as a partnership between the board, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Washington State Recreation and Conservation Office. The board is named after Brian Abbott, who was a life-long fisherman, avid salmon recovery leader, and spearheaded creation of the board while serving as executive coordinator of the Governor’s Salmon Recovery Office.

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WDFW News – Anglers must release sockeye in Marine Area 12.

Action: Anglers are required to release sockeye salmon in Marine Area 12 (Hood Canal).

Effective date: July 26 through Sept. 30, 2019.

Species affected: Sockeye salmon.

Location: Marine Area 12 (Hood Canal).

Reason for action: An effort to reintroduce sockeye salmon to Lake Cushman is underway. This is the first year sockeye are returning to this program from a small release in 2017. Managers anticipate the total return to be small in number and are seeking to maximize broodstock available for the program. Therefore, sockeye retention is being closed in the marine area. Future fisheries for sockeye salmon in Marine Area 12 will be considered when a healthy sockeye run is established.

Additional information: For specific regulations, anglers should consult the 2019-20 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet available online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/.

Information contact: David Stormer, Puget Sound Recreational Salmon Manager, 360-902-0058; Mark Baltzell, Puget Sound Salmon Manager, 360-902-2807.

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Mardon Resort / Potholes Reservoir Fishing Report

MarDon Fresh News – July 19, 2019
The current water level on the Potholes Reservoir is 1038.40 feet – down 1.26 feet from last week. The water temps in the sand dunes are in the mid – 70’s to upper 70’s. The water temps on the main Reservoir are in the mid to upper-70 as well.
The sand dunes continue to be very consistent for Largemouth bass! Fish the sand dunes and Crab Creek with 3/8th oz. swim jigs, Senkos, Strike King Cutt’R worms and Spro frogs. The Smallmouth bass are being found on the face of the dam and on the rock piles around Goose Island. Fish Booyah finesse jigs, Wacky Rigged Senkos, Crankbaits, Tubes and DS Minnows for the Smallmouth.
The walleye fishing has continues to be a bit tough. The walleye have spread out and are still in and around the weed beds. Keep at least one rod as close to the weeds as you can – even if it means cleaning weeds off here and there. Fish the West Arm, Crab Creek and the Lind Coulee in 6-20 feet of water. Troll the channels and weed lines with a Slow Death Hook and a 2 oz. bottom walker and ½ a crawler in 8-15 feet. Troll from .8-1.2 miles per hour. The crankbait bite is picking up as the water is dropping over a foot per week. Troll a #5 Flicker Shad or Rapala Shad Rap in the channels and next to the weed beds at 1.5 – 2.5 miles per hour.
The trout fishing continues to be fair this week. Fish in front of Medicare Beach to the Mouth of Crab Creek and in front of the State Park. Troll Wicked Lures Trout Killers, Needlefish spoons, #7 Flicker Shads and Shad Raps at 2.0-3.0 mph. Set the drag fairly light as the average trout is 2-5 pounds and can break the line on the initial strike.
The Channel Cat and Bullhead fishing has been very good this week! Fish the sand dunes with Catfish Magic Bait, Berkley Catfish Nuggets, and worms on the bottom. Fish in up Lind Coulee, the mouth of Frenchman’s Wasteway and in the sand dunes for Channel Cats and Bullhead.
Crappie and Bluegill fishing continues to pick up back in the sand dunes and up in Lind Coulee. It will continue to improve as the water drops – setting up some amazing panfish fishing in August and September. Fish Gulp alive minnows, Trout Magnets, #5 Flicker Shads and Bobby Garland Baby Shads around the willows for panfish.
Call the MarDon Tackle Store for the latest fishing info at 509-346-2651.

Mason Meseberg with one of many healthy smallmouth bass caught while fishing the Potholes Reservoir with his dad, Levi, and grandfather, Mike!

MarDon Resort shop-keep and walleye guide, Nathan Lafrance, shows of a nice stringer of walleye, perch, bluegill and a 15 1/2″ crappie after a good day on the Potholes Reservoir!

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Tahkenitch Produces Jumbo Bluegill

Bill Taylor’s 11-inch 17 ounce is undoubtedly one of the biggest bluegills pulled out of Tahkenitch Lake since it held the Oregon state record way back in 1938 with a one pound 14-ounce fish.

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Pete Heley Outdoors 7 / 17 / 2019

Data regarding the current ocean selective(finclipped) coho season has been updated through July 3rd and 16.3 percent of the quota has been caught and kept with fishing success running at .85 retained salmon per angler/trip. The most successful port so far has been Depoe Bay with 1.22 kept salmon per angler trip.

By far the busiest port has been Newport with 6,400 angler/trips. Garibaldi has been the second busiest salmon fishing port with 3,373 angler trips and Winchester Bay has been the third busiest with 3,073 angler/trips.

The updated(through July 3rd) resuls for all ten ports in our zone are: Garibaldi(3,373 angler trips – ..53 retained salmon per angler); Pacific City(1,985 angler/trips -.92 retained salmon per angler); Depoe Bay(2,449 angler trips – 1.22 retained salmon per angler); Newpor(6,400 angler trips – .97 retained salmon per angler); Florence(0 angler/trips); Brookings(869 angler/trips – .30 retained salmon per angler); Gold Beach(32 angler/trips – .00 retained salmon per angler); Bandon(24 angler/trips – .63 retained salmon per angler): Charleston(315 angler/trips – .76 retained salmon per angler);Winchester Bay 3,073 angler trips – .90 retained salmon per angler.

As for chinook salmon catches, Newport leads with 905, followed by Depoe Bay with 440 .Pacific City with 152 and Winchester Bay with 130.

Brookings continues to produce more keeper coho salmon than chinooks .

Fall chinook salmon usually start entering the lower Umpqua River around the first of July. and several good-sized chinooks to 34 pounds were landed last week by bank anglers casting spinners at various spots in Winchester Bay, such as Half Moon Bay and Osprey Point.

Almost all of the commercial crabbers have quit for the year and as a consequence, recreational ocean crabbing has shown some improvement.

Fishing local beaches for surfperch continues to be slow. Fishing has also been slow for spawning pinkfins in the Umpqua River above Winchester Bay. The live baby surfperch inside the adult females appear small and undeveloped and there were brief hot bites in the latter part of July in each of the last few years.

It appears that there hasn’t been any improvement in salmonid returns in the decades-long severe drawdown “experiment” on Fall Creek Reservoir.

It seems that the Corps of Engineers managed to trade a decent to good warmwater fishery fo essentially nothing. – and it seems they are more than willing to make similar trades on Lookout Point Reservoir and other Lane County reservoirs on the Willamette River system.

Umpqua River smallmouth fishing continues to be very good and should remain so through September. Fishing the Smith river at night for striped bass has also been good, but most of the recent catches have weighed less than three pounds. At least one striper weighing at least 20 pounds is caught each week, but seem to be caught from areas farther upstream than the more numerous smaller stripers are being caught in.

Smaller stripers are also dominating recent Coquille River striper catches – but they seem to average a couple of inches longer than recent Smith River striper catches.

Umpqua Bait in Winchester Bay is still selling live sardines for striper bait and fair numbers of sardines are present in the lower five miles of the Smith River.

Fishing for bullhead catfish and yellow perch is only fair on Tenmile lakes, but several largemouth bass weighing at least six pounds were caught in the last two weeks.

It appears that the ODFW has not followed through on looking into installing aerators to prevent another die-off of big bass in Lake Selmac.

It seems that with the ODFW’s aversion to spending any effort or money on warmwater fisheries, private parties willing to fund the purchase price and maintenance costs of aeration systems will be necessary to protect some of Oregon’s shallow weedy warmwater fisheries that are most at risk.

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WDFW News – Neah Bay Update.

Anglers must release Chinook in Neah Bay beginning Sunday, July 14

Action: Closes Chinook retention.

Effective date: July 14, 2019.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Location: Marine Area 4.

Reason for action: Catch Area 4 is expected to reach its Chinook guideline at current catch rates, which would require closure of the fishery in the area; this rule should extend the fishing season to provide opportunity to access harvestable coho in the area.

Additional information: Waters of Marine Area 4 east of a true north-south line through Sail Rock are closed. The daily limit for salmon in Neah Bay remains at two salmon.

Anglers are reminded to always check for emergency rule changes prior to fishing. Rule changes can be found on the website at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/ or by calling the fishing hotline at 360-902-2500.

Information contact: Region 6 office, 360-249-4628

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