Monthly Archives: August 2019

WDFW News – Bat-killing disease white-nose syndrome confirmed east of the Cascade Range in Washington.

White-nose syndrome, an often-fatal disease of hibernating bats, has been confirmed for the first time in Washington east of the Cascade Range. Kittitas County is the fourth county in Washington affected by the disease or the causal fungus, joining King, Pierce, and Lewis counties.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) received four dead bats from a landowner outside of Cle Elum this spring. WDFW sent the bats to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Wildlife Health Center in Madison, WI for testing, where scientists confirmed all four bats had white-nose syndrome. The bat species are either Yuma myotis (Myotis yumanensis) or little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus), two species that are hard to tell apart visually.

Earlier this year, the same landowner alerted WDFW that a large group of bats has lived on their property for over 50 years. Biologists confirmed it was a maternity colony, which is where female bats give birth and nurse their young. In August, scientists counted more than 750 bats at the site.

“We are thankful that this homeowner was a caring steward of these bats and reached out to let us know about the bats on their property, and for reporting the dead bats,” said Abby Tobin, white-nose syndrome coordinator for WDFW. “We rely on these types of tips from the public of sick or dead bats, or groups of bats, to monitor bat populations and track the spread of this deadly bat disease.”

White-nose syndrome is harmful to hibernating bats, but does not affect humans, livestock, or other wildlife.

In 2016, scientists first documented white-nose syndrome in Washington near North Bend in King County. Since then, WDFW has confirmed 34 cases of the disease in three bat species in the state. A timeline of fungus and white-nose syndrome detections in Washington is available online at https://wdfw.wa.gov/bats.

First seen in North America in 2006 in eastern New York, white-nose syndrome has killed millions of bats in eastern North America and has now spread to 33 states and seven Canadian provinces.

The disease is caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, which attacks the skin of hibernating bats and damages their delicate wings, making it difficult to fly. Infected bats often leave too early from hibernation, which causes them to lose their fat reserves and become dehydrated or starve to death.

As predators of night-flying insects, bats play an important ecological role in preserving the natural balance of your property or neighborhood. Washington is home to 15 bat species that benefit humans by eating tons of insects that can negatively affect forest health, commercial crops, and human health and well-being.

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WDFW News – Anglers may retain one adipose-intact fall Chinook in a section of the Snake River.

Effective date: Aug. 31, 2019 through Oct. 31, 2019

Species affected: Fall Chinook salmon

Location:
A) Snake River from the mouth (Burbank to Pasco railroad bridge at Snake River mile 1.25) to Lower Granite dam.
B) Clarkston: Snake River from the downstream edge of the large power lines crossing the Snake River (just upstream from West Evans Road on the south shore) upstream to the Oregon/Idaho state line.

Reason for action: The states of Washington, Oregon and Idaho have been working on a new joint federal permit that will allow the retention of adipose-intact fall Chinook salmon in the Snake River. On Aug. 30, NOAA Fisheries approved the permit, allowing WDFW to implement this rule.

Additional information:
A) Daily limit 6 adult hatchery (adipose fin-clipped) Chinook, no daily limit for jack Chinook; release all other salmon.
B) Daily limit 6 adult Chinook with up to one adipose fin intact adult, no daily limit for jack Chinook; release all other salmon.

The fishery is open seven days per week. Adipose fin-clipped fish must have a healed scar at the location of the missing fin. WDFW is requiring that all Washington licensed anglers cease fishing for the day once they have retained their daily limit of either steelhead or adult salmon as a method to reduce catch and release mortality on steelhead. In addition, anglers must use barbless hooks when fishing for chinook or steelhead in the Snake River. Anglers cannot remove any chinook or steelhead from the water unless it is retained as part of the daily bag limit. Anglers should be sure to identify their catch because returning unmarked Chinook salmon, coho salmon and steelhead are also in the Snake River during this fishery.

Anglers should continue to check emergency regulations for new and changing seasons. In addition, anglers are reminded to refer to the 2019/20 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet for other rules and regulations.

Information contact: Jeremy Trump, District 3 Fish Biologist (509) 382-1005

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Lewis River reopens for Chinook salmon harvest.

Action: Allows retention of hatchery Chinook salmon on the Lewis River.

Effective date: Sept. 1, 2019.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Location: Lewis River from Johnson Creek to the overhead powerlines below Merwin Dam.

Reason for action: Hatchery spring Chinook broodstock in the Lewis River are no longer present after Aug. 31. Fall Chinook abundance in the Lewis River is expected to provide harvest opportunity, therefore the closure to Chinook retention during August 2019 to maximize the spring Chinook available for broodstock of Chinook salmon is no longer needed.

Additional information:

Regulations for salmon in the Lewis River from the mouth to the overhead powerlines below Merwin Dam for Sept. 1-30:

Min. size 12″. Daily limit 6. Up to 4 adults of which 2 may be hatchery Chinook may be retained. Release all salmon other than hatchery Chinook and hatchery coho.

Anglers are reminded to always check for emergency rule changes prior to fishing. Rule changes can be found on the website at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/ or by calling the fishing hotline at 360-902-2500.

Information contact: Tom Wadsworth, District Fish Biologist, (360) 906-6709.

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Informational Update Regarding Derelict Crab Gear.

The Oregon post-season derelict commercial crab gear removal program is operational from August 30 through October 11, 2019. Please report locations of derelict crab gear to (541)867-0300 ext. 267.

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CDFW Seeks Information Related to Listing of Northern California Summer Steelhead

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is seeking information relevant to the proposed listing of Northern California Summer Steelhead as an endangered species.

Northern California Summer Steelhead occupy a relatively small geographic range in Humboldt and Mendocino counties that includes Redwood Creek and the Mad, Eel, Van Duzen and Mattole rivers. They fill a unique ecological niche, entering freshwater in the spring and early summer and then holding for many months in deep pools high up in the stream systems while waiting to spawn.

In September 2018, the Friends of the Eel River submitted a petition to the California Fish and Game Commission requesting to list Northern California Summer Steelhead as an endangered species under the California Endangered Species Act (CESA). The petition described threats impacting the survival of the fish, specifically emphasizing habitat loss, alteration and degradation as a result of human impacts.

CDFW recommended that Northern California Summer Steelhead be advanced to candidacy for CESA listing and the Commission voted in favor of this recommendation on June 12, 2019. The official findings of this decision were published on June 28, 2019, which triggered the start of a 12-month period during which CDFW will conduct a status review intended to inform the Commission’s ultimate decision on whether to list the species.

As part of the status review process, CDFW is soliciting information from the public regarding Northern California Summer Steelhead ecology, genetics, life history, distribution, abundance, habitat, degree and immediacy of threats to reproduction or survival, adequacy of existing management measures, and recommendations for management of the species. Comments, data and other information can be submitted in writing to:

California Department of Fish and Wildlife
Attn: Vanessa Gusman
830 S St.
Sacramento, CA 95811

Comments may also be submitted by e-mail to vog.ac.efildliwnull@tgmefildliw. If submitting comments by e-mail, please include “NC Summer Steelhead” in the subject heading.

All comments received by Sept. 22, 2019, will be evaluated prior to the submittal of CDFW’s final status review report to the Commission. Once CDFW submits the final status review report to the Commission, it will be placed on the agenda for discussion at the next available Commission meeting. Comments will also be made available to the public at that time.

Following receipt of CDFW’s status review report, the Commission will allow a 30-day public comment period prior to taking any action on CDFW’s recommendations.

The listing petition and CDFW’s petition evaluation for Northern California Summer Steelhead is available at https://fgc.ca.gov/cesa#ncss.

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Potholes Reservoir / Mardon Resort Fishing Report.

MarDon Fresh News – August 30, 2019
The current water level on the Potholes Reservoir is 1030.75 feet – down 1.26 feet from one week ago. The water temps in the sand dunes and on the main Reservoir are in the upper 70s to low 80s.
The bass fishing continues to be outstanding! The water is dropping – pulling baitfish and the bass to the face of the dunes and onto the habitat boxes and humps. Fish the sand dunes and Crab Creek with 3/8th oz. swim jigs, Senkos, Strike King KVD 2.5 Square Bill crankbaits, and SPRO frogs. As the water continues to drop – the outer dunes and the face of the dunes will continue to improve. Reports of bigger bass are coming in – being caught on the face of the sand dunes in 15-25 feet of water. The Smallmouth bass are being found on the face of the dam and on the rock piles around Goose Island – as well as in the sand dunes. Fish Booyah finesse jigs, Wacky Rigged Senkos, Crankbaits, Tubes and DS Minnows for the Smallmouth.
The walleye fishing is improving as the water drops. Like the bass fishing – as the water drops – both baitfish and the walleye will move out of the dunes to the face and onto the humps. This provides walleye anglers with a better opportunity to troll crankbaits without hassling with the weeds. Fish the West Arm and Crab Creek in 6-20 feet of water. Troll the channels and weed lines in the sand dunes with a Slow Death Hook and a 2 oz. bottom walker and ½ a crawler in 8-15 feet. Troll from .8-1.2 miles per hour. Troll a #5 Flicker Shad or Rapala Shad Rap in the channels and next to the weed beds at 1.5 – 2.5 miles per hour. If the fish are not there – move to the face of the sand dunes using the same techniques.
Several reports of good trout fishing came in this week from Medicare Beach to the Mouth of Crab Creek and in front of the State Park. Troll Wicked Lures Trout Killers, Needlefish spoons, #7 Flicker Shads and Shad Raps at 2.5 -3.0 mph. Set the drag light as the average trout is 2-5 pounds and can break the line on the initial strike.
The Channel Cat and Bullhead fishing remains to be extremely productive this week. Use Catfish Magic Bait, Berkley Catfish Nuggets, and worms on the bottom for both. Fish up Lind Coulee, the mouth of Frenchman’s Wasteway and in the sand dunes for Channel Cats and Bullhead.
Big Bluegill and big crappie are being caught on the face of the dunes and in the mouth of Crab Creek. Several reports of good crappie fishing in Lind Coulee have come in as well. Troll #5 Flicker Shads to locate schools or use your electronics to find the schools and drop Bobby Garland Baby Shads and Trout Magnets to the fish. Perch are being caught in the mouth of Crab Creek and on the humps in front of the exposed dunes.
Call the MarDon Tackle Store for the latest fishing info at 509-346-2651.
Upcoming Events:
August 31-Sept 2 – Labor Day Weekend

September 1st – Karaoke with Paul Carlson at the Beach House!
MarDon Resort Yard Sale – Saturday – August 31 – Awesome deals on awesome stuff!
September 13-15 – Marathon Dock Fishing Tournament and Potluck

Robin Beekman Johnson with a nice Potholes Reservoir Rainbow Trout!

Nicole Storie shows off a nice Reservoir Walleye caught trolling a #5 Flicker Shad!

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Huge Changes in Oregon’s Recreational Bottomfishing.

Recreational bottomfish fishing at all depths to reopen early, on September 3rd

Beginning on Tuesday, September 3rd, recreational bottomfish anglers in Oregon will be able to fish at any depth, including beyond the 40 fathom regulatory line. The depth restriction, which is used to limit yelloweye rockfish mortality, can be lifted earlier than planned this year because enough yelloweye rockfish quota remains to accommodate some additional opportunity for deep water lingcod and rockfish.

During days open to both all-depth bottomfish and all-depth halibut, anglers may retain bottomfish and halibut on the same trip. Such dates will include September 6-7, and will continue for every Friday and Saturday until October 26, or until the halibut quota has been met.

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Pete Heley Outdoors 9/ 29 / 2019

Data regarding the current ocean selective(finclipped) coho season has been updated through August 18th and 42.5 percent of the quota has been caught and kept with fishing success running at .72 retained salmon per angler/trip for the season.. The most successful port so far continues to be Depoe Bay with 1.00 kept salmon per angler/trip.

Ocean salmon-fishing continued its gradual several week decline.with salmon-fishing success now down to .72 retained salmon per angler/trip. Newport continues to be the busiest port along the central Oregon coast. It’s 19,818 angler/trips is nearly twice as many as Winchester which is the second busiest port with. 10,315 angler trips Garibaldi is third with 9,594 angler/trips.

The updated(through August 18th) resuls for all ten ports in our zone are: Garibaldi 9,594 ( angler/trips – .49 retained salmon per angler); Pacific City (5,167 angler/trips -.85 retained salmon per angler); Depoe Bay (7,128 angler trips – 1.00 retained salmon per angler); Newpor(19,818 angler /trips – .88 retained salmon per angler); Florence(0 angler/trips); Brookings(3,267 angler/trips – ..28 retained salmon per angler); Gold Beach(189 angler/trips – .00 retained salmon per angler); Bandon(244 angler/trips – .40 retained salmon per angler): Charleston(2,195 angler/trips – .53 retained salmon per angler/; Winchester Bay (10,315 angler trips – .58 retained salmon per angler.

Brookings had 3,359 angler trips and .28 retained salmon per angler – and about 40 percent more kept cohos than chinooks. which is very unusual. For the season it took about nine angler/trips for each keeper chinook.

The Non-selective ocean Coho Season: Open August 31/September 1, and each Friday- through Sunday through the earlier of September 30 or the quota of 9,000 coho. Bag Limit: Two salmon per day. Minimum lengths: Coho – 16”; Chinook – 24”; steelhead – 20”; and no minimum length for pink, sockeye, or chum salmon in ocean fishery.

As for chinook salmon catches, Newport leads with 1,209 followed by Winchester Bay Bay with 763 and Depoe Bay with 663.

With two weeks left in the season, 42.5 percent of the quota has been caught and kept and there is no chance that season quota will be met or even approached. when the season ends on August 25th.

The Non-selective Coho Season: is set to open August 31-September 1, and each Fri-Sun through the earlier of September 30 or the quota of 9,000 coho. Bag Limit: Two salmon per day. Minimum lengths: Coho – 16”; Chinook – 24”; steelhead – 20”; and no minimum length for pink, sockeye, or chum salmon in ocean fishery. Unless fishing conditions are terrible the season won’t last long.

I would be very surprised if there are not major changes in next year’s ocean chinook salmon season.

Saturday, August 31st is a “free fishing day” in California

Free Fishing Days are different in California than they are in Oregon. In California, every angler must have the appropriate report card if they are fishing for: steelhead, sturgeon or salmon in the Smith, Klamath, ot Trinity river systems.

The best tuna fishing in decades is currently happening along most of the the Oregon coast – and a few other tuna species, including bluefins have also been caught.

As the Columbia River’s salmon outlook becomes ever more dismal, it seems that the river’s shad runs are becoming more robust.

The shad are non-native (they’ve only been around for about 130 years. Water temperatures and ocean conditions in recent years have definitely favored the shad.

Nearly 7.5 million of the 18-inch, 3 to 8 pound fish crossed Bonneville Dam this year -more than four times the number of salmon and steelhead that have crossed the dam this year.

China, copper and quillback rockfish must be released when fishing from a boat, effective 12:01 a.m. on Friday, August 23, 2019. Other species not affected.

Retention of China, copper and quillback rockfish will be prohibited unless fishing from shore beginning Friday, August 23rd. Catch of these species is infrequent when fishing from shore, and contributes a very small amount of additional mortality. Therefore, persons fishing from shore may continue to retain China, copper and quillback rockfishes.

Bag limits remain unchanged for lingcod, flatfish, greenling and other rockfish species (such as black, blue, deacon, canary and vermilion rockfishes). Harvest of these species is well within guidelines, and no closure of the bottomfish fishery is expected for 2019.

Despite these pre-emptive restrictions, crabbing and bottomfishing out of Winchester Bay have been very good.

As of August 23rd, Anglers may keep two Pacific halibut per day in the sport halibut fisheries in the Central Oregon Coast and Southern Oregon Subareas (subareas south of Cape Falcon to the OR/CA Border), beginning Friday, August 23, 2019.

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2019 STEP Labor Day Salmon Derby Starts Saturday.

2019 Salmon Derby Poster_2019 Salmon Derby Poster (1) 2

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Mardon Resort / Potholes Reservoir.

The current water level on the Potholes Reservoir is 1032.01 feet – down 1.33 feet from one week ago. The Reservoir is 2.91 feet higher than it was this day last year. The water temps in the sand dunes and on the main Reservoir are in the upper 70s to low 80s.
The bass fishing is outstanding! With the water level up almost three feet higher to the day compared to last year – bass anglers have the opportunity to fish spots back in the sand dunes that would not be accessible in a normal year. That said – the water is dropping – pulling baitfish and the bass to the face of the dunes and onto the habitat boxes and humps. This combination offers excellent bass fishing opportunities across a lot of real estate. Fish the sand dunes and Crab Creek with 3/8th oz. swim jigs, Senkos, Strike King KVD 2.5 Square Bill crankbaits, and SPRO frogs. As the water continues to drop – the outer dunes and the face of the dunes will continue to improve. Reports of bigger bass are coming in – being caught on the face of the sand dunes in 15-25 feet of water. The Smallmouth bass are being found on the face of the dam and on the rock piles around Goose Island – as well as in the sand dunes. Fish Booyah finesse jigs, Wacky Rigged Senkos, Crankbaits, Tubes and DS Minnows for the Smallmouth.
The walleye fishing is slowly improving as the water drops. Like the bass fishing – as the water drops – both baitfish and the walleye will move out of the dunes to the face and onto the humps. This provides walleye anglers with a better opportunity to connect and a more weed-free path to troll crankbaits. Fish the West Arm and Crab Creek in 6-20 feet of water. Troll the channels and weed lines in the sand dunes with a Slow Death Hook and a 2 oz. bottom walker and ½ a crawler in 8-15 feet. Troll from .8-1.2 miles per hour. Troll a #5 Flicker Shad or Rapala Shad Rap in the channels and next to the weed beds at 1.5 – 2.5 miles per hour. If the fish are not there – move to the face of the sand dunes using the same techniques.
No reports on trout fishing this week. If you do want to catch some nice Rainbows your best bet would be to fish in front of Medicare Beach to the Mouth of Crab Creek and in front of the State Park. Troll Wicked Lures Trout Killers, Needlefish spoons, #7 Flicker Shads and Shad Raps at 2.5 -3.0 mph. Set the drag light as the average trout is 2-5 pounds and can break the line on the initial strike.
The Channel Cat and Bullhead fishing remains to be extremely productive this week. Use Catfish Magic Bait, Berkley Catfish Nuggets, and worms on the bottom for both. Fish up Lind Coulee, the mouth of Frenchman’s Wasteway and in the sand dunes for Channel Cats and Bullhead.
Big Bluegill and big crappie are being caught on the face of the dunes and in the mouth of Crab Creek. Several reports of good crappie fishing in Lind Coulee have come in as well. Troll #5 Flicker Shads or locate schools, or use your electronics to find the schools and drop Bobby Garland Baby Shads and Trout Magnets to the fish. Perch are being caught in the mouth of Crab Creek and on the humps in front of the exposed dunes.
Call the MarDon Tackle Store for the latest fishing info at 509-346-2651.
Upcoming Events:
August 24th – Lake Poker Run – All day event – challenging game competition with payout. Food will be provided for the event. Call MarDon Resort for sign- up information.
August 31-Sept 2 – Labor Day Weekend

Annual guest of MarDon Resort – Collin Posner and family from Gold Bar caught a mixed bag this weekend of catfish, perch and this big 29” walleye weighing 9.0 pounds caught trolling a #5 Perch Rapala!<bJackson Purcell of Moses Lake with a 10” Bluegill caught on the Potholes Reservoir – lots of big Bluegill out there this year!

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