Monthly Archives: July 2014

Sturgeon Retention To Be Allowed In Bonneville Pool For Four Days In July

Oregon and Washington fishery managers announced today that the Bonneville Pool will re-open for sturgeon retention on July 11-12 and July 18-19.

On these days the mainstem Columbia River from Bonneville Dam to The Dalles Dam will be for the retention of sturgeon between 38-inches and 54-inches fork length.

Sturgeon fishing (retention and catch-and-release) is prohibited in the sturgeon spawning sanctuary from The Dalles Dam downstream 1.8 miles to a line from the east (upstream) dock of the Port of The Dalles boat ramp straight across to a marker on the Washington shore during May 1 through July 31.

For the Dalles Pool and adjacent tributaries, managers announced an Aug. 1 closure based on low catch rates in recent years and a shift in angler effort to fall salmon and steelhead.

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Salmon And Crabbing Still Hot At Winchester Bay.

A boat limit of coho salmon and dungenss crabs for anglers fishing Wednesday with Bryan Gill of The Umpqua Angler. Salmon were caught from 80 to 100 feet below the surface in 200 feet of water.

A boat limit of coho salmon and dungenss crabs for anglers fishing Wednesday with Bryan Gill of The Umpqua Angler. Salmon were caught from 80 to 100 feet below the surface in 200 feet of water.

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Pete Heley Outdoors 07/02/2014

The Umpqua’s famed run of redtailed surfperch is slowing down – and nobody seems to care. Everybody wants to go salmon fishing.

There seems to be good numbers of both Chinook salmon and cohos off Winchester Bay, but conditions on the Umpqua River Bar and in the ocean have limited angler participation. In fact, on more than one recent occasion rough ocean conditions have kept salmon anglers from taking advantage of an unrestricted bar.

Ocean crabbing is much improved and limits are possible when ocean conditions allow it.

Some of the most interesting outdoor news this week originated south of the Oregon border. It seems that one family found out the hard way that eating the roe from a female cabezon, no matter how long it is cooked, is ill advised and they ended up being hospitalized.

According to Carrie Wilson, in her weekly column for the Western Outdoor News, she states that Milton Love, a researcher for the University of California at Santa Barbara believes that the blur-green color of the flesh in many cabezons, which disappears upon being cooked, is most likely due to copper-based compounds in the shellfish the cabezon consumes.

The key point to remember is that regarding cabezon, which become legal to keep in Oregon starting July 1st, eating their flesh is OK – and downright delicious, but eating the roe – no matter how much it is cooked is a No-No.

While browsing Dave Hudson’s incredibly informative facebook posts, I learned that the school board for a new high school in Utah rejected the students’ first choice for a team name because they felt that “cougars” might be offensive to some women.

The Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) and a number of other animal rights groups received a setback recently when Charity Navigator stripped their ratings and replaced them with a donor advisory warning. Charity Navigator is the nation’s largest and most utilized evaluator of charities and usually rates charities from one to four stars. A donor advisory means that serious concerns have been raised about the charity which prevents the issuance of a star rating. A possible reason for the concern is that HSUS recently received a heavy financial hit when Feld Entertainment, the operator of Ringling Brothers Circus recovered 15.75 million dollars in attorney fees from HSUS and their co-defendents.

As for Pyramid Lake in Nevada, the news just keeps getting better and better. The strains of Lahontan cutthroat trout now being stoced in the lake has resulted in the best fishing on the lake in decades with lots of the trout weighing 15 to 25 pounds – even more encouraging was the discovery by biologists that even though spawning conditions in the Truckee River near the lake are of marginal quality, some of the Lahontan cutts have successfully spawned.

The quality of the Pyramid Lake fishery has prompted some anglers to annoint the lake as the best lunker trout fishery in the west, while others claim it is the best lunker trout fishery in the world. What I find most encouraging, is that now that there is evidence of successful spawning – the fishing is probably going to get even better and maintaining this quality fishery in the future should be easier and less expensive.

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