Monthly Archives: August 2014

More Jumbo Walleyes From Potholes Reservoir

Loren and Kaye Woodward caught these walleye fishing on Potholes Reservoir.  The Woodwards enjoy summer living on the Royal Slope and return home to Main for the rest of the year.

Loren and Kaye Woodward caught these walleye fishing on Potholes Reservoir. The Woodwards enjoy summer living on the Royal Slope and return home to Main for the rest of the year.

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Mardon Resort/Potholes Reservoir Fishing Report

Late August with a relatively low water level on Potholes Reservoir the fishing is simply great!!! Our fishery has shown real repair from the devastation caused on May 18, 1980 when the Mt. St. Helens eruption deposited four inches of ash all over the area. The ash covered the spawning areas and stopped fish production. Now, the fish are finally back! Perch up to 10 inches have been common and bluegill 6 inches and longer are showing up in limit numbers off the MarDon Dock. We have also been seeing 14 inch crappie since May off the dock and also being caught in the Lind Coulee arm of Potholes Reservoir and all over the sand dune area. Bass fishing on Potholes Reservoir is still very active. We are seeing limits of smallmouth bass and hearing about lots of nice evening catches of largemouth bass on top-water lures.

Events:

7th Annual Lake Games and Beach Party starting at 11am on Saturday and ends at 5pm. The beach party starts at 6pm with dinner catered by Hugo’s Tacos and DJ starts at 7 by Big Daddy DJ Luke Clark. If you are interested in participating you can call (509) 346-2651 or come and register at the Beach House at MarDon Resort Saturday Morning before the event.

August 30, 2014

Annual Yard Sale at MarDon Resort opens at 9am-2pm on Saturday. Everything in the sale is 50% off and there is lots of tackle and clothing mainly. No returns accepted

Granpa Mike Jones caught this 29 inch 10 pound walleye trolling on the face of the sand dunes.

Granpa Mike Jones caught this 29 inch 10 pound walleye trolling on the face of the sand dunes.

– all sales are final.

September 12-14, 2014

Dock Fishing Tournament and Pie Social

This is a really fun weekend fishing event. The cost is $40 per person and it is a dock fishing tournament that starts Friday evening and does not end until 11am on Sunday. We pay out for 9 different species of fish for the top two weights and end the weekend with an awards ceremony and potluck style meal at noon on Sunday. We do limit this tournament to 200 fishers and we are 25% filled at this date, so if you are interested in joining please call the MarDon Office (509)346-2651 or go to mardonresort.com and download an application.

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Washington Outdoor News – WDFW Adopts New Tactics To Reduce Wolves Sheep Predation.

OLYMPIA – A rancher and state wildlife officials working to herd a flock of 1,800 sheep away from the site of recent wolf attacks in southern Stevens County today received authorization to shoot wolves that approach the flock.

Phil Anderson, director of the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), today authorized livestock owner Dave Dashiell, of Hunters, and agency field staff to use limited lethal measures and preventative steps to avoid additional attacks on the flock.

Since Aug. 14, WDFW has confirmed that wolves killed 16 sheep in four separate incidents on leased forest land near Hunters, a small community about 48 miles northwest of Spokane. The latest attack occurred the night of Aug. 18.

Nine other sheep found prior to Aug. 14 had decomposed to the point where the cause of death could not be determined.

Signals from a radio collar attached to a male wolf in the Huckleberry Pack show the animal was at the site, likely with other pack members, when the attacks occurred, said Nate Pamplin, WDFW wildlife program director.

Necropsies of the carcasses confirmed the sheep were killed by wolves, he said.

“The rancher has four large guard dogs and camps alongside his flock at night,” Pamplin said. “Yet, the attacks have continued, even after the department sent four members of our wildlife-conflict staff and an experienced range-rider to help guard the sheep and begin moving them out of the area.”

To further protect his sheep, the livestock owner has removed the carcasses of dead animals where possible to do so and kept his flock on the move around the grazing areas, Pamplin said.

“Dave Dashiell has worked closely with WDFW field staff to find solutions to this situation,” Pamplin said. “We really appreciate his efforts and his cooperation in working toward a shared goal.”

To support those efforts, Anderson directed WDFW wildlife staff to:

Help the livestock owner find an alternative grazing area away from the Huckleberry Pack.
Capture and collar additional wolves in the pack to provide additional information on their movements.
Be prepared to shoot wolves in the vicinity of the livestock owner’s sheep. Neither WDFW staff, nor the livestock owner, who was also authorized to shoot wolves in the vicinity, will actively hunt the wolves or attempt to draw them into range.
“Observing a wolf in the wild is a fairly rare thing,” Pamplin said. “Given the escalating pattern of attacks on this flock of sheep, it’s safe to assume in this situation that any wolves in the vicinity of that flock pose a direct risk to those animals.”

In 2011, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service removed gray wolves from the federal list of endangered species in the eastern third of the state, but the species is still protected under Washington state law. The state Wolf Conservation and Management Plan and state laws set the parameters for responding to wolf predation on livestock.

“Our preferred option is to help the livestock owner move the sheep to another area, but finding a place to graze 1,800 animals presents a challenge,” Pamplin said. “We’ll continue to do everything we can to avoid further conflict.”

The Huckleberry Pack, confirmed as the state’s seventh wolf pack in June 2012, is known to have at least six members and perhaps as many as a dozen. There is no documented evidence that the pack, named after nearby Huckleberry Mountain, has preyed on livestock until now.

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Pete Heley Outdoors 8/20/2014

The final catch statistics for the Ocean finclipped coho season are now available on the ODFW website. The season ended one hour after sunset on Sunday, August 10th with 48,671 finclipped coho caught and kept – or 60.8 % of the 80,000 fish quote

The catch varied greatly by coastal location. The northern Oregon coast (Florence to Garibaldi) accounted for 87.8 % of the finclipped cohos that were caught and kept. The southern Oregon coast (Winchester Bay to Brookings) accounted for 81.4 % of the retained Chinook salmon.

Important dates for ocean or salmon anglers are: August 30th – when the ocean coho nonselective season begins. In non-ODFW lingo, it means any coho salmon sixteen inches or longer is legal to keep subject to the two salmon daily limit.

September 15th – the start of the nonselective coho season for Oregon’s coastal rivers.

September 30th – the ocean coho nonselective season ends if the 20,000 coho quota has not been reached.

October 15th – Crabbing closes in the ocean for sport crabbers.

October 31st – Fishing for Chinook salmon in the ocean closes.

Umpqua River Chinook fishing has been very inconsistent, but the fishing guides have enjoyed more regular success and some good-sized Chinooks have been caught. A slight drop in eater temperature near Reedsport improved the salmon bite somewhat, but also allowed many of the salmon holding at Reedsport to move farther upriver and Chinooks have been caught at Sawyers Rapids and Elkton.

The ODFW will hold pheasant hunting workshops at Fern Ridge Wildlife Area for women 18 years of age or older on September 5th and for adults 18 years  of age or older on September 6th. All participants will need to have valid hunting licenses and upland game bird validations with HIP.

The  cost of the seminars is $62.00, which seems reasonable since it includes a pheasant hunt following the workshop that includes the use of a guide and a hunting dog. For more information on the workshops and similar opportunities, visit the ODFW website or call Janice Copple(503-947-6019 or Mark Newell(503-947-6018).

Rich Olson of Winchester Bay reported nearly 40 miles of water with no temperature varience early last week, but they caught 17 tuna by trolling for scattered fish. The tuna have been within reach of anglers launching out of Winchester Bay, but afternoon winds have greatly extended the time needed to return.

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Washington Outdoor News – New Puget Sound Smelt Fishing Regulations Now In Effect

OLYMPIA – State fisheries managers are reminding people of new recreational and commercial smelt fishing regulations now in effect for Puget Sound.

The new rules, adopted by the Washington Fish and Wildlife Commission in June, provide greater protection for smelt, which serve as a food source for a variety of species in Puget Sound.

The commission, a citizen panel that sets policy for the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, adopted new regulations that:

Close nighttime recreational dip net fishing. Recreational dip net fishing will be allowed from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Friday through Tuesday. Jig gear can continue to be used seven days per week, 24 hours per day.
Add a new 60,000-pound annual quota for the Puget Sound commercial smelt fishery.
Reduce the commercial fishery by one day each week, allowing commercial fishing from 6 a.m. to 10 p.m. Monday through Thursday during seasonal openings in each area.
Close inactive commercial smelt fisheries, including dip bag and purse seine.
For more details on the regulations, visit the department’s webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/smelt/ .

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Canby Man Wins Rifle For Completing ODFW Permit

SALEM, Ore. – It pays to be a conscientious hunter.

Matt Bauder can attest to that. He was awarded a brand new Savage .17 HMR rifle for completing a permit designed to help ODFW better manage private hunting lands.

Bauder’s name was drawn from a pool of hunters who filled out daily use permits last year at ODFW’s Access and Habitat areas. The rifle was purchased by the Oregon Hunters Association Redmond Chapter and offered as an incentive for hunters to complete the permits when they hunt on private A and H program lands.

Access and Habitat areas are private lands open to hunting through an agreement between ODFW and the landowners. The A and H Program is interested in knowing which properties hunters use and like the most. A and H pays landowners for hunter access, either in cash or by providing wildlife habitat improvements on site. The program also funds law enforcement projects on industrial timberlands open to public hunting.

“Daily use permits are a good tool for helping us decide where to invest in access,” said Matt Keenan, ODFW’s Access and Habitat Program Coordinator.

ODFW now places self-serve permit stations at the entrances to private lands enrolled in the Access and Habitat Program to estimate hunter use and satisfaction. Bauder hunted at the Lost Valley Ranch near Fossil and filled out one of the A and H permits when he and his buddies were hunting. Bauder gave the area high marks, even though he didn’t bag an elk.

The A and H program was established in 1993 by the Oregon Legislature, and is funded primarily by a $4 surcharge on all hunting licenses and the sale of deer and elk auction and raffle tags. It currently operates on an annual budget of about $1.25 million, which is used to maintain public access to approximately 5 million acres of private land each year.

For more information about the Access and Habitat program and hunter access to private lands, visit the program website at www.AccessAndHabitatHunts.com.

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Big Smallmouth Biting At Potholes Reservoir

Mike Holmes shows a 7 pound smallmouth bass (released).  Mr. Holmes as his students know him has enjoyed many years of bass fishing on Potholes Reservoir.

Mike Holmes shows a 7 pound smallmouth bass (released). Mr. Holmes as his students know him has enjoyed many years of bass fishing on Potholes Reservoir.

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Pete Heley Outdoors 8/13/2014

Salmon fishing was very good during the middle of last week, but much tougher over last weekend. While the best catches have been made by anglers fishing the ocean off Winchester Bay, some untimely minus tides combined with fairly early mid-morning windy conditions have resulted in some fairly narrow windows of opportubity for would-be ocean salmon anglers.

The ocean finclipped salmon season ended at one hour after sunset last Sunday(August 10th) with about half the quota uncaught.. The ocean remains open for adult Chinook salmon through October 31st. Although it is still kind of early, finclipped cohos are still legal to keep in the Umpqua River.

The ocean will reopen for coho salmon on August 30th when the nonselective season begins.The coho quota for this season will be adjusted according to the uncaught portion of the just ended ocean coho season – but not exactly on a fish for fish basis.

Since the nonselective coho season for coastal rivers typically does not begin until September 15th, I can foresee some confused anglers getting tickets and two weeks of an enforcement nightmare for biologists and state troopers.

Tickets were common at Winchester Bay this weekend as numerous anglers were convinced that the jumbo unclipped cohos they caught were Chinook salmon. Salmon Harbor also cracked down on people who were using the launch ramps without paying the launch fee and then trying to hide their crime by parking in other parts of Winchester Bay.

There will be another two day halibut opener for the summer season on Friday and Saturday(August 15 and 16).

Conditions appeared promising this week for anglers wanting to fish for tuna out of Winchester Bay.

Crabbing continues to be very good at Winchester Bay, but crabbing pressure is heavy enough to ensure success is best entering the weekends – rather than at the ends of the weekends. Poorly placed crab gear blocking paths needed by boats has become a major problem at Winchester Bay.

Spinner flingers trying for salmon from shore at Half Moon Bay and Osprey Point are accounting for several salmon each day and, surprisingly, a salmon was reported caught at the Winchester Creek bridge last weekend.

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Ocean Coho Season Closes On An Inconsistent Note – Guides Still Doing Well

The ocean fishery for fin clipped coho salmon closed on a disappointing note last Sunday evening, but fair numbers of Chinook salmon were caught off Winchester Bay.

Chinook salmon will remain legal to keep in the ocean through October 31st.

Finclipped cohos remain legal angling fare in rivers where finclipped steelhead are legal to keep.

A boat limit of Winchester Bay salmon - photo courtesy Bryan Gill (The Umpqua Angler-541-852-9889).

A boat limit of Winchester Bay salmon – photo courtesy Bryan Gill (The Umpqua Angler-541-852-9889).

 

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Mardon Resort Fishing Report

With the warm water temperatures we are having great fishing on Potholes Reservoir. The surface temperatures are hovering around 80 degrees. These temperatures have made spiny ray fishing very active. Perch 8” to 12” are being caught at the mouth of Crab Creek and the off the fishing dock at MarDon Resort. Crappie action has been really great from the Lind Coulee arm of Potholes Reservoir as well as the MarDon Dock.

Bass fishing early morning and late evenings have been fantastic. Both large and smallmouth are being caught in the dunes and the rock piles all the way down to Lind Coulee. Frogs and Top Water poppers are the ticket early morning and late in the day, or Senkos and tubes are your best bet for mid-day catching.

Trolling needlefish and plugs in 20’ to 30’ of water near Medicare Beach and in front of the Potholes State Park will be your best area to try for a nice size rainbow trout from 3 to 6 pounds. As water temperatures drop for the fall the fishing will only get better and better for all species.

Bird watching with this low water is enough reason for an enjoyable evening boat ride. White Pelicans, many types of shore birds and over 10 species of water fowl are now using the unique sand dune are on Potholes Reservoir.

At the MarDon Resort Store we are running a special on Fetha-Stix fishing rods. The normal cost for one of these rods run from $195 – $250 each and we have them on sale for $150 each or 3 for $300. For fishing information or to inquire about upcoming specials please call (509) 346-2651 or just drop in the tackle shop for a visit.

Leonard and William Lowe of Des Moines show these beautiful Jumbo Crappie caught off the MarDon Fishing Dock

Leonard and William Lowe of Des Moines show these beautiful Jumbo Crappie caught off the MarDon Fishing Dock

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