Monthly Archives: April 2016

Mardon Resort / Potholes Reservoir Fishing Report

The Washington ABA Tournaments 2-1 day events, Saturday 4/23 winners were father and son team of Levi & Mason Meseberg (Mason age 5) brought 23.13 lbs to the scales. 32 teams fished Saturday, there were 31 limits, average fish weight 3.49 lbs. On Sunday 4/24 winners were Aaron Echternkamp & Dave Kromm with 20.81 lbs. Mardon thanks Angie Dover and her team from the ABA.
Walleye fishing has noticeably improved since 4/26/16. The full moon is gone and our walleye fishing has picked up with the beginning of the “Walleye post spawn feeding frenzy”. Now the fun begins! Soda, Long and Crescent lakes are producing good walleye and quality smallmouth bass. Warden Lake had a good opener as well as Canal, Windmill, Heart and the Teal lakes. Now all the seep lakes below o’sullivan dam are open to fish.

Mason with some of the winning bass at the ABA event on Saturday.

Mason with some of the winning bass at the ABA event on Saturday.

Bruce Pierson shows a quality smallmouth bass caught in competition.

Bruce Pierson shows a quality smallmouth bass caught in competition.

 Greg Stock party fished with Shelby Ross on Potholes Reservoir for their limits of walleye.  They caught and released an additional 9 more 20" to upgrade their daily limit.

Greg Stock party fished with Shelby Ross on Potholes Reservoir for their limits of walleye. They caught and released an additional 9 more 20″ to upgrade their daily limit.

Dave Meseberg returned from Lake Havasu and caught and released this 6lb 10 oz largemouth bass.

Dave Meseberg returned from Lake Havasu and caught and released this 6lb 10 oz largemouth bass.

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CCA News – Oregon South Coast Chapter.

South Coast Chapter Members,

I hope this notice finds you well. I’m fine, Springer fishing has been good (attached picture of friend and fish caught, yesterday). This is just a reminder of our upcoming meeting at the Winchester Bay Marina Activity Center on May 5th at 6:30 PM. We will have Pizza and refreshments. This meeting will determine the fate of the South Coast Chapter of CCA, Oregon. No matter the results, I am confident that we can find a common ground that we can support. At the conclusion of the South Coast Chapter meeting, I will describe at a draft level the framework for the new organization and with your input we will define and formalize it. I am excited at the potential that we have for improving the South Coast Fishery and I hope you will be to! The underlying theme of the new organization will be catching more fish, having fun and making a difference.

Thanks for your support,
Steve

From: Steve Godin
Sent: Tuesday, April 12, 2016 8:28 AM
To: Steve Godin
Subject: Fw: So. Coast Chapter Info

South Coast Chapter Members,

Most of you should have received Chris Cone’s message, attached. Most of the message is canned CCA propaganda. The bulleted text is Chris responding to some of the dialog from the meeting. He didn’t bother to address the discussion about the Columbia River centric focus of CCA, Oregon. The first bullet, What is going to happen now? Options, if you elect a new president, the South Coast Chapter can continue. If the members don’t elect a new president, the South Coast Chapter will cease and the members will be rolled into the Eugene Chapter. That kind of sums it up!

I’m not sure what becomes of the South Coast Chapter, but I have started to define the framework of a new organization focused on supporting the South Coast Fishery. Everything is in a draft format and I will be seeking input to formalize the new organization. At the conclusion of the next South Coast Chapter meeting, you will all be invited to participate in the first meeting of the new organization. At that meeting, those of you who wish to participate, will define and name the new organization. I am confident that we can make a difference supporting our South Coast Fishery, have fun and be proud of our accomplishments.

Thanks for your support,
Steve

From: CCA Oregon
Sent: Monday, April 11, 2016 10:30 AM
To: Stephen Godin
Subject: So. Coast Chapter Info

Stephen,

Please mark your calendars! We will be having a CCA South Coast Chapter meeting May 5th at the Marina Activity Center in Winchester Bay 6:30pm. As you are aware we are without chapter leadership as of last meeting. A lot of questions were asked…
“What is going to happen now?” — We have options that we will decide at the next meeting. Do we want to continue as our own chapter or do we get absorbed by the Eugene Chapter?
“Can you communicate better with us?” — Yes! We are in process of starting the State Communications Committee. CCA Oregon also started a So. Coast Chapter Facebook group.
“Can you find issues for us to address here locally, before they become issues?” No, that’s not how CCA works, local chapters and their members are tasked with their own community outreach duties and finding their own local fisheries issues that they would like to see addressed through the CCA Model and CCA Oregon procedures and committees that can utilize our CCA Oregon and National resources. Each Chapter President knows how the process works and would be the chapters best tool to ensure the issue gets the attention it needs.
“Coastal Conservation Association is a non-profit, marine conservation organization. It is comprised of state chapters spanning the Gulf of Mexico, Pacific and Atlantic seaboards. CCA’s strength is drawn from the tens of thousands of recreational saltwater anglers who make up its membership. CCA’s grassroots influence is felt through state capitols, U.S. Congress and most importantly, in the conservation and restoration of our coastal marine resources”.

“CCA has been active in virtually every national fisheries debate since 1984 and has participated productively in state, federal and international fisheries management issues for longer than two decades. CCA continues to operate as a multi-tiered organization, affecting issues on a local, state, regional and national level. CCA’s unmatched breadth and depth of volunteer involvement has made it the largest marine conservation group of its kind. Beyond the tangible accomplishments seen in state and federal legislatures and fisheries management councils, commissions and panels, CCA’s proactive presence defeats many ill-conceived proposals before they bloom. CCA’s grassroots network and unique combination of membership, fundraising, advocacy and communication have enacted positive change on all levels of coastal marine conservation and management.
When called into action, the impact of CCA’s grassroots machine is unparalleled. CCA’s presence in the federal court system has been critical in conserving America’s fisheries. CCA has anadvocacy fund that has been used to defend net bans and bycatch reduction devices, support pro-fisheries legislation and battle arbitrary, federal no-fishing zones.”

“Through broad-based recreational angler and membership support, a strong legal and legislative presence, more than 30 years of experience, and vision for the future of U.S. and global marine resources, CCA will continue to battle for the health and longevity of our coastal fisheries.”

Please attend the next meeting if you want your voice to be heard. If you have any questions comments or concerns call Chris Cone at 541-213-1464

A beautiful Umpqua River springer - photo courtesy Steve Godin.

A beautiful Umpqua River springer – photo courtesy Steve Godin.

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Several Puget Sound Area Marine Fisheries To Close May 1st.

Five lakes and the lower sections of most rivers that flow into Puget Sound will close to all fishing beginning Sunday, May 1, when salmon and steelhead fishing also closes in the Sound.

Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) officials said today they are closing state fisheries in waters where salmon migrate while they work to secure the federal permit required to hold salmon fisheries in Puget Sound. Typically, the state and tribes jointly obtain the federal permit for the Sound, where some fish stocks are protected under the federal Endangered Species Act. The current permit expires April 30.

However, many fishing opportunities remain available in and around Puget Sound. WDFW has posted a list of rivers and sections of rivers that are open to fishing on its webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/pugetsound_salmon_update. That page also has a list of Puget Sound area lakes that are closed to all fishing.

“Since we didn’t reach an agreement with treaty tribal co-managers on this year’s Puget Sound salmon fisheries, we have to close fishing in areas where we know salmon will be,” said Ron Warren, head of WDFW’s Fish Program.

For the next few months, those areas include several Puget Sound-region lakes and the lower reaches of streams where salmon smolts will travel on their way to the Sound.

Lakes that will close May 1 to all fishing include Lake Washington and Lake Sammamish (King County), Monte Cristo Lake (Snohomish County), Lake Cushman (Mason County), and Barney Lake (Skagit County).

Today’s action also applies to Puget Sound-area rivers that typically open to fishing in early June, though fishery managers will be evaluating those rivers to determine whether any can open on schedule.

All non-tribal commercial and recreational Puget Sound salmon and steelhead fisheries, including those in Marine Area 13 and year-round fishing piers around Puget Sound, will close May 1 to salmon and steelhead fishing until further notice. More detailed information about marine area closures can be found online at https://fortress.wa.gov/dfw/erules/efishrules/.

The department is working with federal authorities and doing everything possible to re-open Puget Sound marine and freshwater fisheries, Warren said.

“We regret having to close these fisheries,” Warren said. “We know this is a hardship on many communities around Puget Sound and disappoints many anglers.”

In the meantime, Warren urged anglers to consider trying new fishing waters, emphasizing that most Puget Sound area lowland lakes remain open to fishing.

Also, he said recreational fisheries in Puget Sound marine areas that are not affected by the closures include bottomfish, such as lingcod, Pacific cod and cabezon, as well as sea-run cutthroat trout and halibut. These fisheries are covered under a separate permit and are open as scheduled. Anglers should check the 2015-16 Washington Sport Fishing Rules pamphlet, available online at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/regulations/, for details.

Salmon fishing will continue as scheduled in the Columbia River and Washington’s ocean waters and north coastal rivers. Information on those fisheries can be found on WDFW’s webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/.

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CDFW News – Trout Season To Open Saturday.

The general trout opener in many counties throughout California will commence on Saturday, April 30, one hour before sunrise.

Because of the popularity of this annual event with the angling public, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) is making every effort to stock trout in all accessible waters approved for planting prior to the season opener. Because of the increased rains this winter, CDFW expects most lakes to be open and available for fishing.

Most lakes, rivers and streams have a limit of five trout per day and 10 in possession. However, regulations differ on season opening and closing dates, bag limits, minimum and maximum size limits and gear restrictions.

Anglers are advised to check specific area regulations and opening dates in the 2016-17 California Freshwater Sport Fishing Regulation booklet (www.wildlife.ca.gov/regulations) for regulations specific to each body of water.

In 2012, CDFW regional staff created the Eastern Sierra Back Country Fishing Guide to provide anglers with a quick, informative and accurate account of the distribution of fisheries in back country high elevation lakes. This guide does not address front country waters, defined as lakes and streams that are accessible by vehicle. Most of the lakes lie within U.S. Forest Service lands managed as wilderness and usually require back country permits for overnight use. Most back country fisheries are based on self-sustaining populations of trout and do not need regular trout stocking to maintain fish populations. The guide can be found at https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Regions/6 (under Hunting, Fishing, Education).

Crowley Lake in the Eastern Sierra is expected to be one of the most popular opening day destinations for anglers from around the state. In past years, an estimated 10,000 anglers have turned out for the opener, and approximately 50,000 trout are caught during the first week of the season. Typically Crowley is planted with hundreds of thousands of small and medium sized trout, and because of excellent food sources in the 5,280-acre reservoir, these trout grow to catchable sizes and weigh at least three-quarters of a pound by the opener. About 10 percent of the trout caught at Crowley during opening weekend weigh over a pound and a half. These fish are from stocks planted in previous years or are wild fish produced in Crowley’s tributary waters.

Anglers are asked to be particularly vigilant when cleaning fish and fishing gear at Crowley Lake and in the upper and lower Owens River Drainage. The New Zealand Mudsnail was discovered several years ago in the Owens River Drainage, and CDFW would like to prevent mudsnails from spreading into other waters. To avoid spreading New Zealand Mudsnails and other aquatic invasive species to other waters, anglers are advised to dispose of their fish guts in bear-proof trash cans, rather than throw them back into the water. Wading gear should be properly cleaned before using in new waters.

All persons age 16 and older must possess a valid California fishing license to fish within state lines. Freshwater fishing licenses can be purchased online at www.wildlife.ca.gov/licensing/online-sales or at regional CDFW offices or other license agents. Anglers no longer have to display their license visibly above the waist but they must have it in their possession while fishing.

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Sport Sturgeon Fishing To Close In The Dalles Pool.

Action: Closes retention of sturgeon in The Dalles Pool.

Effective dates: April 30, 2016, until further notice.

Species affected: White sturgeon.

Location: The Columbia River and tributaries from The Dalles Dam upstream to John Day Dam (The Dalles Reservoir).

Reason for action: The harvest guideline of 100 fish is expected to be reached.

Other information: Catch-and-release fishing for sturgeon will continue to be allowed.

The Dalles Pool spawning sanctuary is in place. The area from the Rufus grain elevator upstream 2.4 miles to John Day Dam is closed to all sturgeon fishing from May 1 through July 31.

Information contact: Region 5 Office: 360-696-6211.

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WDFW, Tribes Call Off Talks Again On Puget Sound Salmon Fisheries.

After additional discussions Wednesday, state and tribal fishery managers did not reach an agreement for this year’s Puget Sound salmon-fishing seasons.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) and treaty tribes separately will continue to seek federal permits necessary for holding marine and fresh water fisheries in Puget Sound, where some fish stocks are protected under the federal Endangered Species Act.

“We had one last round of negotiations in hopes of ensuring salmon seasons in Puget Sound this year,” said Jim Unsworth, director of WDFW. “Regrettably, we could not agree on fisheries that were acceptable to both parties.”

The department proposed salmon fisheries that allowed anglers to harvest chinook while protecting coho, which are expected to return in low numbers this year. The state’s proposed fisheries met conservation goals that WDFW and the tribes had previously agreed upon, Unsworth said.

State fishery managers are uncertain whether the department will receive the necessary permit in time to hold salmon fisheries in Puget Sound through much of the season.

WDFW and the tribes typically secure a federal permit together for holding Puget Sound salmon fisheries. State and tribal fishery managers did not reach agreement during the annual season-setting process, which concluded in mid-April. Further talks last week were also unsuccessful.

Unsworth said he is hopeful the state and tribes can work together in the future to develop plans to bolster salmon stocks as well as improve the season-setting process.

“We want to work with the tribes to address long-term resource management concerns, such as restoring habitat and increasing hatchery fish production,” Unsworth said. “The breakdown in this year’s negotiations demonstrates the need for a change to the process of setting salmon-fishing seasons.”

Absent an agreement, all non-tribal commercial and recreational Puget Sound salmon fisheries, including Marine Area 13 and year-round fishing piers around Puget Sound, will close May 1 to salmon fishing until further notice.

Any updates on Puget Sound salmon-fishing seasons will be posted to WDFW’s webpage at http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/, where summaries of this year’s salmon fisheries for the Columbia River, Washington’s ocean waters and north coastal rivers can be found.

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2016b Halibut Seasons Finalized By Oregon Fish And Wildlife Commission.

The Oregon Fish and Wildlife Commission adopted the staff recommended recreational Pacific halibut seasons at their meeting last Friday.

A map with season dates and regulations can be found at: http://www.dfw.state.or.us/MRP/finfish/halibut/seasonmaps/2016_hbt_map.pdf

Columbia River Subarea

All-Depth–Opens Sunday May 1. Open every Thursday-Sunday until September 30 or the quota is attained.

Nearshore–Opens Monday, May 2. Open every Monday-Wednesday until September 30 or the quota is attained.

Central Oregon Coast

Spring All-Depth–fixed dates are: May 12-14; May 19-21; May 26-28; and June 2-4. If any quota remains after those dates, back-up days will be announced. Possible back-up dates are: June 16-18; June 30-July 2; July 14-16; and July 28-30.

Summer All-Depth– opens August 5-6. Open every other Friday and Saturday until October 31 or the quota is attained.

Nearshore– Opens June 1, seven days per week until October 31 or the quota is attained.

Southern Oregon Subarea–Opens May 1, 7 days per week until October 31 or the quota is attained.

For additional information see the ODFW recreational halibut webpage.

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WDFW News – Hatcheries Releasing Steelhead Under Newly Approved Federal Permits.

State fishery managers have begun releasing more than 500,000 juvenile steelhead from five state fish hatcheries into Puget Sound rivers after receiving word from NOAA-Fisheries that those facilities meet federal environmental standards.

For the past two years, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) has released steelhead from those five hatcheries into area lakes to ensure they wouldn’t interfere with wild steelhead protected by the federal Endangered Species Act (ESA).

That action resulted from a legal agreement with the Wild Fish Conservancy, which stipulated that WDFW would not release steelhead smolts into area rivers until NOAA-Fisheries determined that its hatchery operations comply with the federal law.

Now that WDFW has received the necessary federal permits, the department is again releasing smolts that will migrate to the ocean and return as adult steelhead after two years, said Kelly Cunningham, deputy assistant director of WDFW’s Fish Program.

“We are pleased that NOAA-Fisheries agrees our hatchery plans are scientifically sound,” Cunningham said. “This means that we can again produce fish for harvest in fisheries throughout Puget Sound.”

WDFW hatcheries in northern Puget Sound currently releasing hatchery smolts include:

Wallace Creek, 27,600
Reiter Ponds, 140,000
Whitehorse, 130,000
Kendall Creek, 150,000
Tokul Creek, 74,000
NOAA-Fisheries also approved a permit allowing the Dungeness Hatchery to release 10,000 steelhead smolts on the Olympic Peninsula, but those releases will take place in mid-May due to the timing of the run, Cunningham said.

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WDFW News – Yakima River Smallmouth Bass Study Still On Going.

Action: Requires the release of smallmouth bass tagged in the dorsal fin with an orange “spaghetti” tag.

Effective dates: April 12 through May 13, 2016.

Species affected: Smallmouth bass.

Location: Lower Yakima River and Columbia River in the Yakima Delta area near Bateman Island, Benton Co.

Reason for action: Yakama Nation fishery staff are tagging up to 55 adult smallmouth bass with acoustic (sonic) tags on April 12-13, possibly extending into the following week depending on collection conditions. This is part of a telemetry study tracking bass movements in the lower Yakima River during their spring migration/spawning season.

To implant the acoustic tags, the bass will be anesthetized using the Food and Drug Administration-approved chemical sedative MS-222. All fish with acoustic tags will be visibly identifiable by an orange “spaghetti” tag inserted at the base of the dorsal fin. These tagged smallmouth bass should be released and must not be eaten. Residual anesthetic in the tagged fish will dissipate by mid-May and be safe for human consumption under the FDA rules.

Information contact: John Easterbrooks, regional Fish Program manager, (509)-457-9330.

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CDFW News – Spiny Lobster Report Cards Due by April 30.

The California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) reminds 2015-2016 Spiny Lobster Report Card holders to return their cards by April 30, 2016 as required by law. The cards must be returned even if no lobsters were taken or no attempts were made to take lobsters.

Card holders should review their report cards carefully and check that the information recorded is complete and accurate. Information collected from the cards provides CDFW with data necessary to monitor and manage California’s spiny lobster fishery.

Any 2015-2016 Spiny Lobster Report Card holder who fails to return their card(s) by April 30, 2016 will be charged a non-return fee of $21.60 upon issuance of a Spiny Lobster Report Card in the subsequent fishing season. Otherwise they may choose to skip one fishing season to be able to purchase a spiny lobster report card the following season at no extra cost. If multiple spiny lobster report cards were purchased, please report all cards, including lost cards, to avoid the non-return fee when purchasing a spiny lobster report card next lobster fishing season.

Spiny Lobster Report Card data can be submitted either online at www.wildlife.ca.gov/reportcards or by mail to:

CDFW – Lobster Report Card
3883 Ruffin Rd.
San Diego, CA 92123

For additional information and a list of frequently asked questions about this program, please visit CDFW’s California Spiny Lobster webpage.

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