Monthly Archives: September 2017

Central Coast All-Depth Halibut Season Closes.

Central Oregon Coast Subarea

Summer All-Depth: A combination of good weather for the last opening, and halibut on the bite especially on Friday allowed anglers to land 16,047 pounds. This leaves only 2,734 pounds on the summer all-depth quota, which is not enough for any additional all-depth days. The remaining pounds will be moved into the nearshore fishery.

Over the course of the summer season, the average weight of landed fish was approximately 30 pounds round weight, up from last year’s average of approximately 28 pounds.

Nearshore: There were 780 pounds landed last week. With the rollover from the summer all-depth season, there are 4,363 pounds remaining on the adjusted nearshore allocation. The average size for this year’s nearshore season is just a little bit bigger than the summer all-depth season (approximately 30.5 pounds round weight). The nearshore season is open seven days per week until October 31, or the adjusted quota is caught.

Southern Oregon Subarea

This area remains open seven days per week until October 31 or the quota is caught. 3,436 pounds remain.

Reminder: with the recent recreational bottomfish closure, no species of bottomfish (rockfish, lingcod, cabezon, etc) except for other flatfish species, may now be retained.

ODFW is seeking input on two proposed changes to the 2018 recreational halibut seasons.

There will be 2 public meetings, both of which begin at 6 p.m.:

Tuesday, September 26, at the North Bend Public Library, 1800 Sherman Street, North Bend

Wednesday, September 27 at the ODFW Marine Resources Newport Office, 2040 SE Marine Science Drive, Newport, OR. This meeting will also be available via webcast.

You can join the meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.

https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/939817925

You can also dial in using your phone.

United States: +1 (224) 501-3412

Access Code: 939-817-925

First GoToMeeting? Try a test session: http://link.gotomeeting.com/email-welcome

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Suprise Catch By A Winchester Bay Salmon Angler.

Aaron Abraham, better known as “Abe”, was fishing in Winchester Bay’s East Boat Basin with sand shrimp in the hopes of catching one of out local STEP Chapter’s returning chinook salmon.

Instead, he hooked and landed three good-sized pile perch. The smallest perch weighed a pound and a half, but the other two weighed 2.70 and 2.69 pounds when weighed on an accurate scale.

By the way, a number of other anglers did catch salmon while fishing sand shrimp, roe and herring beneath their bobbers.

Abe’s jumbo pile perch was only .01 pounds heavier than his next largest.

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The Choker Family Strikes Again.

Every fall, I look forward to the Chocker family’s annual visit to Winchester Bay.The main reason I look forward to their visits is not because they insist on keeping me full of their delicious home-grown vegetables, but because they are really nice people and very interesting to converse with.

Nancy Chocker is a well-published writer-photographer in her home state of Idaho and her husband, Steve, seems to invariably be one of the most successful bank anglers each time they visit Winchester Bay from Kimberley, Idaho.

Unlike last year when Steve started hot and then tapered off, he started slowly and then heated up and finished their stay with a salmon limit on their final day.

The Cockers and I are both looking forward to next year’s visit.

Steve Chocker with a bank-caught Winchester Bay Chinook.

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Pamela Dunn’s Jumbo Tenmile Lake Perch.

Fishing for yellow perch at the County Park on South Tenmile Lake is improving, but the perch seem to be topping out at about nine inches in length. Anglers seeking larger perch need to target other areas of the lake and some larger perch have been caught recently.

Pamela Dunn’s 13-inch perch dwarfs the average-sized Tenmile Lake yellow perch held up by her fishing partner.

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Pete Heley Outdoors 9 / 20 / 2017

The big news this past week was the implementation, as of Monday, October 18th, of a complete closure on bottomfishing along the Oregon coast. A similar closure went into effect in 2004, but that closure allowed anglers to target bottomfish while fishing from shore. In another recent year, Oregon’s cabezon fishery was closed because California anglers had retained the entire west coast quota before they realized it.

This complete closure of indefinite duration will result in economic hardship for Charleston, Newport and several other Oregon coastal communities, but it is also bad news for Winchester Bay and Florence which had almost completed their annual six month offshore bottomfishing closure and were scheduled to resume their non-jetty bottomfisheries on October 1st.

The reasoning behind the closure was that recreational efforts have been higher than anticipated this year, – in fact higher than any other year in the last 15 years, and peaked during the month of August. High catch rates, good fishing weather, and fewer other angler opportunities led to more boats and anglers targeting bottomfish this year.

Flatfish, such as sanddabs, flounder, and sole are not included in the closure as are halibut which are managed separately. Surfperch remain legal angling fare as do tuna which have moved shoreward along the southern Oregon coast. Salmon fishing for all species except coho remains open in the ocean through October 31st, but the chances of catching other keepable salmon species besides Chinooks, such as pinks. chums or sockeyes is remote and starting October 1st anglers fishing for salmon or having salmon on board are restricted to waters less than 40 fathoms (240 feet) deep.

Crabbing and clamming are marine activities that remain open and are currently very productive, but both have suffered multiple closures in the last few years due to elevated toxin levels and the taking of razor clams is still not allowed.

According to Joe Cook, of “The Bite’s On” in Empire, many surfperch in Coos Bay have spawned twice this year. Female surfperch taken off Reedsport-area beaches have also contained well-developed baby perch which means they will likely spawn twice this year – or haven’t spawned at all.

It seems like they are catching at least a half-dozen salmon per day from the bank on spinners at Winchester Bay. Salmon fishing success has also picked up for boat anglers and several Umpqua River fishing guides got boat limits for several consecutive days last week. The Coos, Coquille and Siuslaw rivers are starting to offer more consistent salmon fishing and the Rogue River has been hot for the last month. Couldn’t get the final results for the Coos Basin Salmon Derby, but the heaviest salmon taken weighed approximately 23 pounds – and was worth $500.

Slightly cooler weather has improved the trout bite at Lake Marie, but one has to wonder how many trout are left in the lake. Not all of the 800 15-inch rainbows dumped into the lake prior to Labor Day have been caught and kept. Several Coos County lakes will be planted during the second week of October but the only Oregon coast trout plants made this week were made in lakes between Tillamook and Astoria.

The best Columbia River walleye fishery in recent memory is starting to slow down and anglers targeting walleyes in the lower river below Bonneville Dam are catching walleyes of larger average size, but far fewer of them.

The Umpqua and Coquille rivers are still producing very good smallmouth bass fishing and cooler weather should increase the chance of catching larger bass – and make evening fishing every bit as productive as early morning fishing. Striped bass fishing on the Coquille River seems to be improving.

Extremely heavy fishing pressure on the fishing dock in Tugman Park on Eel Lake has finally influenced fishing success. Most of the decent-sized crappies have been caught and kept and even the smaller, frequently-released crappies are starting to wise up. The bluegills hanging out near the dock, possibly because of their smaller mouths, don’t seem to “fished-down” as quickly. I strongly suspect that boat anglers able to access other areas of the lake are enjoying better fishing success – especially for decent-sized fish. The lunker largemouth that was hanging around the fishing dock at Eel Lake was caught, weighed and released last week. At six pounds, it was slightly heavier than estimated – and no longer seems to be hanging around the dock.

Tenmile Lake bassfishing continues to be productive and yellow perch anglers fishing off the fishing dock in the County Park finally caught a few blugill and crappie last week.

Pete Heley works parttime at the Stockade Market & Tackle, across from ‘A’ Dock, in Winchester Bay where he is more than happy to swap fishing info with anyone.

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An Important Message From Steve Godin And The OCA.

OCA Members and Friends,
At our September Meeting we discussed an ODF&W Public Input meeting, that was yet to be announced. It has been formerly announced on the ODF&W Website under Sport Halibut. More information will be posted, along with an on-line survey. This meeting will take place at the North Bend Public Library on September 26th, from 6:00 PM – 8:00 PM. ODF&W is proposing to split the Central Area for Halibut Fishing effective 2018, Cape Falcon to Humbug Mountain into two areas, Cape Falcon to Florence, Florence to Humbug Mountain. I urge all our members and friends to attend this meeting to support this proposal. Why? Newport anglers catch most of the Halibut quota ending the season. This split may provide South Coast anglers a longer season and a crucial first step in getting more say in the management and regulations for our fishery. If you’re not able to make the meeting, take the on-line survey and send any additional comments to ODF&W. A contact person and email should be posted with the announcement and survey.

Anyone interested in ride sharing from Reedsport to North Bend should contact me. I can take a few members and I will try to set up additional passenger opportunities.

Good Fishing,
Steve

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Potholes Reservoir / Mardon Resort Fishing Reports

Some of the best fishing on the Potholes Reservoir is just beginning with the cooling Fall weather! The fishing will pick up for all species – especially bass and walleye. The Potholes Reservoir water level is currently at 1028.85 and rising. The Reservoir level will rise approximately 2.00 inches per day. Continue to us caution when launching your boat and navigating around the dunes and Goose Island. The water temps on the main lake and back in the dunes are right around 77 degrees
The walleye fishing has been excellent this past week! Several limits are being reported. Shelby Ross of Ross Outdoor Adventures got 23 walleyes on Tuesday while guiding – including a quadruple header with all four rods down at the same time! With cooler weather in the forecast the walleye fishing should remain strong. Troll the face of the dunes in 4-15 feet of water. Most fish are being caught trolling #5 or #7 Flicker Shads and Jointed Rapalas in perch, chartreuse, and purple colors. Crawler Harnesses with both blades and Smile Blades have been doing well as has the Slow Death/Smile Blade Combo. Use a 1 ½ once bottom walker.
Crappie, perch and bluegill fishing remains good. Find the habitat boxes and drop a crappie jig, Gulp Alive Minnow, or a Trout Magnet down 4-12 feet. Jumbo perch have been showing around Goose Island. The MarDon Dock is fishing very good for crappie, bluegill and some perch. Dock fishing is only available to registered guests staying at MarDon Resort.
The Channel Catfish and bullhead is excellent right now! Fish around Goose Island and the face of the dunes. The best baits for the catfish and bullheads have been worms and Berkley Power Bait Catfish nuggets.
No change in the largemouth bass fishing – it continues to be outstanding! The fish have stacked up on the face of the dunes and are feeding on the tremendous amount of baitfish in the area. Fish the face of the dunes with Zara Spooks, hula grubs on a football head and wacky rigged Senkos and crankbaits. The face of the dam has been producing quality smallmouth. Fish crankbaits and hula grubs rigged on a football head.
Upcoming Events
September 17 – November 1st Fall Special on already reduced rates!
RV and Tent sites – Pay 2 nights and get the third night FREE
Roofed Rentals – Pay 2 nights and the third night ½ off!
September 15-17, 2017
Marathon Dock Fishing Tournament and Potluck
September 21
Painting Party at the Beach House – come join the fun and paint your own Fall Leaf masterpiece!

Clients of Ross Outdoor Adventures had a great day on the Potholes Reservoir with guide Shelby Ross – catching a mixed bag of walleye, perch, and crappie!

Mike Meseberg of MarDon Resort with a nice largemouth bass caught on the face of the dunes!

Vicki Wenger with a nice dock trout!

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Recreational Bottomfish Closed As Of Monday, After Excellent Summer Season.

Oregon’s recreational bottomfish season will close to all species but flatfish as of Sunday, Sept. 17 at 11:59 p.m. because the quotas for several species have been reached.

As of Monday morning (Sept. 18), anglers may no longer catch or retain lingcod, any species of rockfish, cabezon, greenling, or other bottomfish. There is a new opportunity for anglers to fish for flatfish (except Pacific halibut) at all depths, also starting Monday.

“Recreational bottomfishing was excellent this year, with effort and catch rates higher than anticipated,” said Maggie Sommer, ODFW marine fisheries manager. “Because the annual quotas for several species have been met, fishery managers need to close the season.”

Good weather in spring and summer, as well as fewer opportunities for other fisheries, have led to more boats and anglers fishing for bottomfish this year. “It’s been a poor salmon season and tuna haven’t really made a strong showing within range of most recreational anglers,” said Sommer. “This increased fishing pressure on bottomfish, and anglers had a lot of success pursuing these species.”

Additionally, Oregon’s black rockfish harvest quota was reduced 10 percent this year after a 2015 federal stock assessment. While the stock was determined to be healthy, the assessors also determined that in order to keep the population healthy in the long term, lower harvest levels were necessary. ODFW’s marine researchers are developing additional methods to provide data for future assessments of black rockfish and other nearshore species that will help the assessments accurately reflect Oregon’s stocks.

Several ocean fishing opportunities remain available, including:

Flatfish, such as sanddabs and petrale sole (not including halibut, which are considered separately).
Crabbing in oceans and bays, which has been excellent lately.
Nearshore halibut between Cape Falcon and Humbug Mt. (until Oct. 31 or until the quota is reached).
Halibut south of Humbug Mt. (until Oct. 31 or until the quota is reached).
Tuna, which are starting to come closer to shore in southern Oregon now.
Ocean salmon, which is open from Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt. through Oct. 31 for all salmon except coho (beginning Oct. 1, all anglers fishing for salmon or with salmon on board are restricted to inside the 40-fathom line).
For more information on Oregon’s marine resources and fisheries, please see: http://www.dfw.state.or.us/MRP/

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Contact:
Caren Braby, 541-867-0300 x226, su.ro.etatsnull@ybarB.E.neraC
Maggie Sommer, 541-867-0300 x227, su.ro.etatsnull@remmoS.eiggaM
Christian Heath, 541-867-0300 x266, su.ro.etatsnull@htaeH.T.naitsirhC

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Recreational Bottomfish Closure Set for End of Day Sunday, September 17.

Oregon’s recreational bottomfish season will close to all species but flatfish as of Sunday, Sept. 17 at 11:59 p.m. due to the annual quotas for several nearshore species having been reached. After Sunday, Sept. 17, anglers may no longer catch or retain lingcod, any species of rockfish, cabezon, greenling, or other bottomfish, except for flatfish species (sole, flounders, sanddabs and halibut other than Pacific halibut).

Recreational efforts have been higher than anticipated this year, higher than any other year in the last 15 years, and peaked during the month of August. High catch rates, good fishing weather, and fewer other angler opportunities led to more boats and anglers targeting bottomfish this year. “It’s been a poor salmon season and tuna haven’t really made a strong showing within range of most recreational anglers,” said Maggie Sommer, ODFW. “This increased fishing pressure on bottomfish, and anglers had a lot of success pursuing these species.”

Several ocean fishing opportunities remain available, including:
– Flatfish, such as sanddabs and petrale sole (not including Pacific halibut, which are managed separately) open to all depths starting Monday, Sept. 18.
– Crabbing in oceans and bays
– Nearshore halibut between Cape Falcon and Humbug Mt. (until Oct. 31 or until the quota is reached).
– Halibut south of Humbug Mt. (until Oct. 31 or until the quota is reached).
– Tuna, which are starting to come closer to shore on the south coast of Oregon now.
– Ocean salmon, which is open from Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt. through Oct. 31 for all salmon except coho (beginning Oct. 1, all anglers fishing for salmon or with salmon on board are restricted to inside the 40-fathom line).

For more information on Oregon’s marine resources and fisheries, please see:
http://www.dfw.state.or.us/MRP/

And the News Release:
http://www.dfw.state.or.us/news/2017/09_sep/091217b.asp

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Navigating Peteheley.com – Use The Search Button.

With nearly 2,000 outdoor-related posts in the several years of peteheley.com’s existance, there are relevant posts regarding almost every subject.
However non-recent posts on a specific subject may be hard to find.

That is where the “search” button in the upper right hand corner comes in. Type in the proper “search words” and several related blogs will appear. Hopefully one of the choices will provide the information you are seeking.

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