Monthly Archives: May 2018

Possible World Record Crappie Taken in East Tennessee.

A 5.46 pound crappie was recently caught in a pond in Paint Rock, Tennessee. If DNA tests confirm that the jumbo fish was a black crappie, it could be a new world record – although the fish is also heavier than the world record white crappie.

Years ago, Louisiana had a dubious state record black crappie of six pounds listed as a sac-a lait.
Congratulations to Jam Ferguson and his absolutely huge crappie.

5+ pound crappie are extremely rare.

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Ford’s Pond Bassfishing

Tried for some bass and panfish at Ford’s Pond earlier this week. The previous week, the bass spawn was winding down, but there were some large bass still on, or near, their spawning sites.

As usual, the crappie and bluegill were difficult to find, but the fishing for largemouth bass was fair – especially when we first started slightly after 7 am. Dwayne Schwartz got a three pounder on a buzz bait in the first five minutes, but the next several bass averaged slightly over a pound. An earlier start would have increased our chance at hooking larger bass.

The shallow weedy 90 acre pond can get quite warm and the bottom is covered with weeds reaching to the surface or nearly to the surface and a buzz bait is an effective lure for this bass fishery. A plastic worm, rigged completely weedless, would be another good lure choice.

The yellow perch and smallmouth bass, that were very much in evidence last year, seemed to have disappeared.

The extensive submerged brush near the pond’s south shoreline seems like ideal crappie habitat, but is difficult to fish.

Pete Heley holds up a typical Ford’s Pond largemouth taken on a buzz bait.


Just south of, but disconnected from Ford’s Pond, is s much smaller pond that also contains bass and panfish and can be fished by those walking the land just south of Ford’s Pond.

At any rate, it’s good to have Ford’s Pond as a fishing option – thanks to the city of Sutherland purchasing it from private ownership. Due to the warm, shallow, very weedy water, trout will not be stocked, but there may be improved parking and a fishing dock in the pond’s future.

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Pete Haley Outdoors 5 / 16 / 2018

Some boat crabbers are making fair catches of dungeness crabs near Charleston in Coos Bay and in Half Moon Bay in Winchester Bay. Dock crabbers are catching a few crabs at Charleston and at high tide in Winchester Bay. On an ominous note, the state of Washington recently announced that crabbing will not reopen this summer in Marine Areas 11 and 13. This closure is not because of toxins, but primarly because the crab harvest in those areas has shrunk by more than 85 percent in both areas since 2014.

Spring chinook fishing on the Umpqua remains very slow with just enough salmon being landed to keep some anglers fishing A few salmon have been hooked by bank anglers casting green or chartreuse spinners at Half Moon Bay and Osprey Point in Winchester Bay. Moss and suspended algae are starting to become a problem – especially above Scottsburg. Ocean fishing for chinook salmon was starting to produce a few fish, but rough ocean and bar conditions have limited recent fishing pressure. The heaviest spring chinook turned in, as of last weekend, to the annual contest at the Wells Creek Inn weighed 29 pounds and nine ounces.

There are boat anglers trying every day, but so far only three redtail surfperch have been reported caught above Winchester Bay. The run is definitely late and could start at any time. When this run is well underway, there are sometimes more than 50 boats and well over 100 anglers fishing the three miles of Umpqua River above Winchester Bay – and with a 15 fish daily limit – it is amazing that this fishery has sustained itself as well as it has. My preference would be an eight perch daily limit, but two years ago the state of Washington raised their daily limit on surfperch from nine fish to 12.

Despite windy conditions, Winchester Bay’s South Jetty is still producing decent fishing. Unlike the catch restrictions on anglers using the long leader technique in water deeper than 40 fathoms (240 feet), jetty anglers and fishermen fishing water less than 30 fathoms or 180 feet deep can use conventional bottomfishing gear and techniques and keep lingcod, greenling and black and blue rockfish.

Although they are seldom reported, a few striped bass are being caught on the Smith River. The Coquille River still has fair numbers of mostly younger and smaller stripers, but many of them are now larger than the 24-inch minimum length limit. Many of the Coquille’s stripers, especially in the Myrtle Point area, are taken incidentally by anglers fishing larger crankbaits for smallmouth bass.

The hottest fishery in our area is for shad – and excluding a few short term lulls, for the last two weeks it has been redhot. The most popular spot has been the Yellow Creek area, nearly midway between Elkton and Sutherlin. Most of the shad fishing at Yellow Creek is done by bank anglers, but the fishing has been so good that some boats are showing up as well. Continued good weather will most likely allow the Umpqua River to drop enough to make Sawyer’s Rapids, nine miles west and downriver of Elkton, the most productive shad fishing spot. The excellent shad fishing has tended to over shadow the increasingly-good smallmouth bass fishing on the Umpqua River..

There are no trout plants scheduled this week in our area, but the Newport-area lakes are being stocked this week. Several local waters are slated to receive trout plants next week – including Loon Lake with 2,ooo legal rainbows.

As usual, most of the bassfishing pressure in our area is occuring on Tenmile Lakes. Black crappies are starting to show up at the fishing dock at Tugman Park on Eel Lake – with a few bluegills and smaller bass as well. Loon Lake is fishing fair for crappies, bass and trout and very good for bluegills.

To the best of the ODFW’s knowledge, Oregon is still a state that is free of chronic wasting disease (CWD). However that classification is fragile and may be temporary – as evidenced by a recent event.

Parts from a Montana deer that had CWD was brought into Oregon in violation of Oregon law. Oregon State Police were alerted by Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks personnel and contacted the Oregon resident who had already burried some of the infected body parts in a local landfill – and not recoverable. State police were able to properly dispose of the rest of the deer.

Since deer do not normally forage around in landfills, the unrecovered deer parts, hopefully, will not continue to jeopardize Oregon’s “CWD-free status”.

CWD is a terrible disease that targets the brain in infected deer, is always fatal and can last in the environment for years – making it almost impossible to eradicate. Please do your part to keep Oregon CWD-free.

The last reported outbreak was in 2010, but Oregon’s sea lions are once again suffering from an outbreak of leptospirosis – a bacteria-caused affliction that occurs sporadically in marine mammals worldwide. Most of Oregon’s infected sea lions have been along the north coast – in Lincoln, Tillamook and Clatsup counties

What makes leptospirosis more dangerous than many wildlife diseases is than it can be transmitted to other wildlife species, live stock, especially dogs and even humans. Beach visitors are strongly advised to keep their dogs on a leash.

Pete Heley works parttime at the Stockade Market & Tackle, across from A’ Dock, in Winchester Bay where he is more than happy to swap fishing info with anyone.

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WDFW News – Boaters Asked to Observe ‘No-Go’ Zone Along Western San Juan Island to Protect Orcas.

State fish and wildlife managers are asking anglers and other boaters to avoid an area along the west side of San Juan Island in an effort to protect a dwindling population of southern resident killer whales.

Despite state and federal government protection, the population of southern resident killer whaleshas declined from 98 whales in 1995 to just 76 in December 2017. Major threats to the whales include a lack of prey – chinook salmon, in particular – disturbance from vessel traffic and noise, as well as toxic contaminants.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) will be working with partner agencies and stakeholder groups to help educate people about the voluntary “no-go” zone, which applies to all recreational boats – fishing or otherwise – as well as commercial vessels.

The no-go zone is located on the west side of San Juan Island, including:

From Mitchell Bay in the north to Cattle Point in the south, extending a quarter-mile offshore for the entire stretch.
In an area around the Lime Kiln Lighthouse, the no-go zone extends further offshore – half of a mile.
A map of these areas is available on WDFW’s website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/orca/, where boaters also can find existing regulations on properly operating vessels near orcas.

These waters represent the areas in the San Juan Islands that southern resident killer whales most frequently use for foraging and socializing. To improve conditions for the whales, WDFW is asking vessel operators to stay out of these key areas to allow the whales a quiet area to feed.

“This voluntary no-go zone is a good step in helping to reduce human impacts in an important foraging area for southern resident killer whales,” said Penny Becker, WDFW’s policy lead on killer whales.

In March, the governor signed an executive order creating a task force and directing WDFW and other state agencies to take immediate action to benefit southern resident killer whales. In designing this year’s salmon fisheries, the department reduced fisheries in areas – such as the San Juan Islands, the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and Admiralty Inlet – important to orcas.

In late April, NOAA Fisheries asked the state to take additional action to protect southern resident killer whales during the upcoming fishing season. In response, the state included the voluntary measure in a set of actions NOAA should consider as the federal agency develops authorization for Puget Sound salmon fisheries.

“This step will help support killer whale recovery and prevents a potential delay in federal approval for our salmon fisheries throughout the entire Sound,” said Ron Warren, head of WDFW’s fish program.

Warren acknowledged that this is a difficult request to make of anglers who fish the San Juans, given the reduced opportunities for salmon fishing in the area this year. But there are a variety of other salmon fisheries in Puget Sound this season.

In particular, he noted that in other areas of the Sound anglers have more opportunities to fish for coho salmon than in recent years. More information about this year’s salmon fisheries can be found online at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/.

Warren said there is an exception for vessels participating in a commercial fishery targeting Fraser River sockeye that takes place in the northern portion of the no-go zone, given the limited number of commercial openings (six to eight days) this year.

As part of the governor’s directive, WDFW is working with NOAA and state agencies to increase hatchery production of salmon to benefit southern resident killer whales. However, it will take three to four years for fish released from Washington hatcheries to be available as returning adults for the whales.

WDFW also will continue to work with tribal co-managers and other agencies to restore salmon habitat.

“Our efforts to recover killer whales ultimately will mean more salmon returning to Puget Sound each year, which will benefit anglers as well as orcas,” Warren said.

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WDFW News – Marine Areas 11 and 13 Will Not Open for Crabbing This Summer.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) today announced that two marine areas in south Puget Sound will not open for crab fishing this summer to allow Dungeness crab populations to rebuild.

Recreational crab fisheries will remain closed in marine areas 11 (Tacoma/Vashon Island) and 13 (south Puget Sound) this summer. Tribal commercial crab fisheries also will not open in those areas this year.

State and tribal co-managers are developing crabbing seasons for the rest of Puget Sound and plan to announce those later this month.

“We are still working on setting crab seasons but wanted to give people early notice about these closures, which is a change from previous years,” said Bob Sizemore, Puget Sound shellfish manager for WDFW. Sizemore said the department will continue working to structure fisheries in each Puget Sound region, but he does not anticipate closures similar to those in marine areas 11 and 13.

The populations of harvestable Dungeness crabs are low in both areas 11 and 13, based on pre-season test fisheries, Sizemore said. Additionally, Dungeness crab harvests have fallen 88 percent in Marine Area 11 and 90 percent in Marine Area 13 since the 2014-15 season. Input from recreational crabbers also indicates support for the closures.

“We are taking this step to protect crab in these areas and allow the populations to rebuild,” Sizemore said.

Water currents can carry young crab long distances, making it possible for crab larvae from robust populations to settle and grow in areas 11 and 13, Sizemore said. But it can take several years for a newly settled Dungeness crab to grow and reach the minimum harvestable size of 6 ¼ inches.

A variety of factors could be contributing to the declining population of crab in areas 11 and 13, Sizemore said. These include reduced survival of crab larvae, a higher-than-normal mortality rate for juvenile crab, or changing ocean conditions such as elevated surface water temperatures.

The department will post Puget Sound recreational seasons on its crab-fishing website at fishing website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/crab/, where information on fishing regulations as well as an educational video on crabbing can be found.

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Yakima River to Open for Hatchery Spring Chinook Fishing.

Action: Open three sections of the Yakima River to fishing for hatchery spring chinook salmon.

Species affected: Chinook salmon.

Areas:

The Hwy. 240 Bridge in Richland (river mile 2.1) to the Grant Ave. Bridge in Prosser (river mile 47.0), about 1,000 feet downstream of Prosser Dam.
The Wine Country Rd. Bridge in Prosser (river mile 47.3), about 1,300 feet upstream of Prosser Dam, to the State Route 241 (Sunnyside – Mabton Hwy.) Bridge (river mile 59.8).
From the Interstate 82 bridge at Union Gap (river mile 107.1) to the BNSF railroad bridge approximately 600 feet downstream of Roza Dam (river mile 127.8).
Dates: May 18, 2018, until further notice.

Reason for action: Yakama Nation and WDFW fishery managers are forecasting a harvestable return of 2,000 or more adult Cle Elum Hatchery spring chinook to the Yakima River, despite the run timing being late again this year.

Rule information (applies to all three areas):

Daily limit of two (2) hatchery chinook. Minimum size: 12 inches. Hatchery salmon are identified by a missing adipose fin and a healed scar in the location of the missing fin. Wild salmon (adipose fin intact) must be immediately released unharmed and cannot be removed from the water prior to release.
Terminal Gear: Up to two (2), single-point, barbless hooks with a hook gap from point to shank of 3/4 inch or less. Use of bait is allowed.
A Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Endorsement is required to participate in this fishery. See: https://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/crss_endorsement/
The use of two (2) fishing poles is permitted during the salmon fishery provided the participating angler has purchased a “Two-Pole Endorsement” (in addition to the freshwater fishing license and Columbia River Salmon and Steelhead Endorsement). See: https://wdfw.wa.gov/licensing/twopole/
Additional rule for Area A:

In Area (1) A., the Yakima River is closed to all fishing from 200 feet downstream to 200 feet upstream of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation Chandler Pumping Station (river mile 35.8) for the duration of the salmon fishery.
Additional rules for Area C:

Upstream of the Interstate 82 Bridge at Union Gap, the “Selective Gear Rules” prohibiting use of bait and knotted nets is suspended for the duration of the salmon fishery.
The upper “closed water” boundary line is moved upstream to the BNSF railroad bridge downstream of Roza Dam to provide additional opportunity to harvest hatchery chinook salmon.
Night closure in effect. Harvest of all game fish, such as trout, whitefish, etc., remains closed until Saturday, June 2.
Fishing from boats equipped with an internal combustion motor (ICM) is allowed only from the I-82 Bridge at Union Gap to the eastbound (upstream) I-82 bridge at Selah Gap. Boats with an ICM may be used for transportation only upstream of the Selah Gap bridge.
Closed to fishing for all species 400 feet upstream from the upstream side of the Yakima Ave. /Terrace Heights Rd. bridge in Yakima, including the area adjacent and downstream of the Roza Wasteway No. 2 fish barrier rack next to Morton & Sons Inc.
Information contacts: Marc Divens, District 8 fish biologist, (509) 457-9301 (Yakima); Paul Hoffarth, District 4 fish biologist, (509) 545-2284 (Pasco)

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WDFW News – Pacific Halibut Fishing to Close After May 11 in Marine Area 1.

Action: Close recreational halibut fishing at the end of the day Friday, May 11 in Marine 1.

Effective dates: 11:59 p.m. Friday, May 11, 2018

Species affected: Pacific halibut.

Location: Marine Area 1.

Reason for action: The all-depth recreational halibut fishery in Marine Area 1 opened Thursday, May 3 and continued Friday, May 4 and Sunday, May 6. During those three days, anglers caught 8,455 pounds of the 11,182-pound quota for the all-depth fishery in the Washington portion of the Columbia River area.

There is sufficient quota remaining to continue the all-depth recreational halibut fishery through Friday, May 11 but not enough to keep the fishery open Sunday, May 13 without risk of exceeding the quota. The nearshore halibut fishery in Marine Area 1 will remain open Mondays through Wednesdays until further notice.

These rules conform to management actions taken by the International Pacific Halibut Commission and the National Marine Fisheries Service.

Information contact: Heather Reed, (360) 902-2487

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Columbia River Subarea Recreational All-Depth Pacific Halibut Fishery to Close at 11:59 p.m. on Friday, May 11, 2018.

The Columbia River Subarea (Leadbetter Point, WA to Cape Falcon, OR) recreational all-depth halibut fishery will be closing at 11:59 p.m. on Friday, May 11, 2018. The allocation of 11,182 pounds is anticipated to have been taken by that time. The Columbia River Subarea all-depth fishery will then be closed for the remainder of 2018.

The Columbia River Subarea recreational nearshore fishery remains open Monday-Wednesday, until September 30 or the 500 pound set-aside has been harvested.

Other Pacific halibut areas/fisheries

The Central Oregon Coast Subarea (Cape Falcon to Humbug Mt.) spring all-depth season fixed open dates are: May 10-12, May 24-26, June 7-9, and June 21-23. Following June 23rd, if quota remains, additional back-up dates may be available.

The Central Oregon Coast Subarea nearshore fishery opens June 1, seven days per week. During days open to both nearshore and all-depth halibut fishing, all-depth rules and regulations apply.

The Central Oregon Coast Subarea summer all-depth fishery opens Aug 3-4, every other Friday and Saturday.

The Southern Oregon Subarea (Humbug Mt. to the OR/CA Border) opened May 1, seven days per week.

REMINDER: Descending devices are mandatory for vessels fishing for or retaining halibut or bottomfish, and must be used when releasing any rockfish when fishing deeper than 30 fathoms.

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Pete Heley Outdoors 5 / 09 / 2018

A few spring chinook have finally been landed by bank anglers casting spinners at Half Moon Bay. The first springer reported caught at Half Moon Bay was landed in the early afternoon on Sunday, April 29th. Overall, the Umpqua’s spring chinook fishery above Wells Creek continues to be slow with just enough fish being caught to keep people trying.

Anglers fishing the ocean for chinooks last week had some success near the Umpqua River Bar.

Shad fishing has picked up on the Umpqua River with most of the fishing pressure taking place at Yellow Creek. Daily catches of more than 20 shad are quite possible. With continued good weather and river levels dropping, shad fishing at Sawyer’s Rapids should show a noticeable improvement. Bright pink and chartreuse remain the most popular for the jigs, shad darts, small spoons and flies used to catch these fish. One shad angler last weekend landed an eight pound spring chinook and a ten pound native steelhead while shad fishing. He had to release the steelhead, but was able to keep the salmon – as well as more than a dozen shad.

The only trout plants in our area for this week are Upper and Lower Empire lakes which are each slated to receive 2,000 trophy rainbows. However there should be plenty of trout left in the numerous local lakes that were stocked last week – including Bluebill, Bradley, Butterfield, Carter, Cleawox, Eel, Floras, Munsel, Saunders, Sutton, Upper Empire and North and South Tenmile Lakes.

Thursday, Friday and Saturday (May 10-12) is the first all-depth three-day halibut opener for the central coast subarea. As usual, fishing success depends in a major way on weather and bar conditions – and the rougher it is, the larger the proportion of anglers choosing to fish out of Newport. Two things that would improve my opinion of how the ODFW handles the spring all-depth halibut fishery are (1) – separate the southern portion of the all-depth central coast subarea from the northern portion of the central coast subarea based upon actual halibut population and (2) – make the spring all-depth openers more fair to people working Monday through Friday who currently only have a chance to fish on Saturday.

Descending devices are mandatory equipment to have on board while halibut fishing.

The very popular run of female surfperch that spawn in the three miles of Umpqua River above Winchester Bay has not started in earnest as of last weekend. It should happen any day and there were several perch taken last week around Marker 12. Several boats are fishing the area each day anticipating their arrival. In the meantime, all the local beaches are producing fair to good surf fishing for “pinkfins” with most people using Berkley Gulp sandworms for bait.

The South Jetty at Winchester Bay is still producing good lingcod fishing, as well as decent fishing for greenling, rockfish and striped surfperch. Pat Jones, a very successful lingcod angler, hit the South Jetty last Friday and caught ten lingcod, but forgot his measuring tape and since almost all of his fish were around the 22-inch minimum legal length – he went home with only one six pound lingcod.

Some nice smallmouth bass bailed out a fishing trip on a cool, windy day last week on Woahink Lake. They weighed between 1.5 and two pounds and fought well on a day when every other of Woahink’s fish species seemed lethargic. With the possible exception of Galesville Reservoir, Woahink offers the best lake fishing for smallmouth bass within a two hour drive of Reedsport.

Last Wednesday, the largemouth bass were uncooperative at Loon Lake, but we quickly switched to panfishing and the bluegills and crappies were fairly cooperative. Most of the panfish are at the upper end of the lake, but the two largest crappies I caught were within a half-inch of a foot long and they were caught on the other side of the lake near the summer homes. Northern pikeminnows, which are rarely caught in Loon Lake were extremely aggressive in the morning near the road at the upper end of of the lake.

While the largemouth bass in lakes near Interstate 5, between Sutherlin and Medford are either spawning or have finished spawning, the coastal lakes are just entering their pre-spawn phase and moving to shallow water as water temperatures allow.

Quite a few smallmouth bass in the Umpqua and Coquille rivers have already spawned and should become easier to catch in the clearing water.

Most of the bassfishing pressure in our area takes place on Tenmile Lakes, but Siltcoos and Tahkenitch lakes are less-pressured alternatives that consistently give up quality largemouths and all three lakes should offer good bassfishing over the next several weeks.

However, bass and panfish anglers fishing out of float tubes, pontoon boats or small portable craft such as canoes or kayaks can fish numerous smaller waters between North Bend and Florence. Most of these waters have largemouth bass and yellow perch, a few have bluegills, crappies and brown bullheads – and a few are even planted with rainbow trout – but the main thing is that you will often have them to yourself

Most of the waters in central Oregon are now open and fishable, but kokanee fishing in Wickiup Reservoir has been very slow – to the point where nobody is complaining about the daily five kokanee limit. Most of the kokanee taken have been between 16 and 20-inches in length. Wickiup’s bassfishing is exceptional from late May through mid-August.

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Boaters Asked to Observe ‘No-Go’ Zone Along Western San Juan Island to Protect Orcas

State fish and wildlife managers are asking anglers and other boaters to avoid an area along the west side of San Juan Island in an effort to protect a dwindling population of southern resident killer whales.

Despite state and federal government protection, the population of southern resident killer whaleshas declined from 98 whales in 1995 to just 76 in December 2017. Major threats to the whales include a lack of prey – chinook salmon, in particular – disturbance from vessel traffic and noise, as well as toxic contaminants.

The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) will be working with partner agencies and stakeholder groups to help educate people about the voluntary “no-go” zone, which applies to all recreational boats – fishing or otherwise – as well as commercial vessels.

The no-go zone is located on the west side of San Juan Island, including:

From Mitchell Bay in the north to Cattle Point in the south, extending a quarter-mile offshore for the entire stretch.
In an area around the Lime Kiln Lighthouse, the no-go zone extends further offshore – half of a mile.
A map of these areas is available on WDFW’s website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/orca/, where boaters also can find existing regulations on properly operating vessels near orcas.

These waters represent the areas in the San Juan Islands that southern resident killer whales most frequently use for foraging and socializing. To improve conditions for the whales, WDFW is asking vessel operators to stay out of these key areas to allow the whales a quiet area to feed.

“This voluntary no-go zone is a good step in helping to reduce human impacts in an important foraging area for southern resident killer whales,” said Penny Becker, WDFW’s policy lead on killer whales.

In March, the governor signed an executive order creating a task force and directing WDFW and other state agencies to take immediate action to benefit southern resident killer whales. In designing this year’s salmon fisheries, the department reduced fisheries in areas – such as the San Juan Islands, the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and Admiralty Inlet – important to orcas.

In late April, NOAA Fisheries asked the state to take additional action to protect southern resident killer whales during the upcoming fishing season. In response, the state included the voluntary measure in a set of actions NOAA should consider as the federal agency develops authorization for Puget Sound salmon fisheries.

“This step will help support killer whale recovery and prevents a potential delay in federal approval for our salmon fisheries throughout the entire Sound,” said Ron Warren, head of WDFW’s fish program.

Warren acknowledged that this is a difficult request to make of anglers who fish the San Juans, given the reduced opportunities for salmon fishing in the area this year. But there are a variety of other salmon fisheries in Puget Sound this season.

In particular, he noted that in other areas of the Sound anglers have more opportunities to fish for coho salmon than in recent years. More information about this year’s salmon fisheries can be found online at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/northfalcon/.

Warren said there is an exception for vessels participating in a commercial fishery targeting Fraser River sockeye that takes place in the northern portion of the no-go zone, given the limited number of commercial openings (six to eight days) this year.

As part of the governor’s directive, WDFW is working with NOAA and state agencies to increase hatchery production of salmon to benefit southern resident killer whales. However, it will take three to four years for fish released from Washington hatcheries to be available as returning adults for the whales.

WDFW also will continue to work with tribal co-managers and other agencies to restore salmon habitat.

“Our efforts to recover killer whales ultimately will mean more salmon returning to Puget Sound each year, which will benefit anglers as well as orcas,” Warren said.

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