Mardon Resort/ Potholes Reservoir Fishing Report

MarDon Fresh News – October 18, 2019
The current water level on the Potholes Reservoir is 1030.31 feet – down .30 feet from one week ago. The water temp remains around 54 degrees. With the water level where it is – continue to use extreme caution while boating between Goose Island and the face of the dam and the face of the sand dunes!
It continues to be a great time to fish the Potholes Reservoir if you want to catch a mixed bag! The fishing for most all species in the Reservoir is from good to outstanding as the fish react to the changing of the season.
The bass fishing continues to be extremely good! Fish the face of the sand dunes with a ½ oz. football head jig coupled with a hula grub, Senkos, Strike King KVD 5XD crankbaits, Tubes and Jerk Baits. Fish from 2 to 20 feet. The Smallmouth bass are being found on the face of the dam and on the rock piles around Goose Island – as well as on the face of the sand dunes. Fish Booyah finesse jigs, Wacky Rigged Senkos, Crankbaits, Tubes and DS Minnows for the Smallmouth.
The walleye fishing remains good. The lower water temps, cooler nights, and lower water are putting the walleye into a positive feeding mode. Fish the face of the sand dunes in front of the West Arm and Crab Creek, Lind Coulee, and the face of the dam in 5-30 feet of water. Start by trolling a #5 or a #7 Flicker Shad at 1.5-2.0 miles per hour on a long line. If this does not produce – switch to trolling a Slow Death Hook and a 2 oz. bottom walker and ½ a crawler in 8-15 feet. Troll from .8-1.2 miles per hour. Jig Blade Baits when you mark fish on the humps.
For trout – fish Medicare Beach to the Mouth of Crab Creek and in front of the State Park. Troll Gibbs Wee G Spoons, Wicked Lures Trout Killers, Needlefish spoons, #7 Flicker Shads and Shad Raps at 2.5 – 3.0 mph. Use leaded line with 3-colors out or troll with a 2 oz. banana sinker. Set the drag light as the average trout is 2-5 pounds and can break the line on the initial strike.
The Channel Cat and Bullhead fishing is still good – despite the falling water temperature. Fish the slightly deeper holes in around the mouth of Frenchman’s waterway, Crab Creek and Lind Coulee. Look for water in the 10-15-foot range. Use Catfish Magic Bait, Berkley Catfish Nuggets, Liver and worms on the bottom for both.
Bluegill and big crappie and a few Perch continue to be caught on the face of the dunes and in the mouth of Crab Creek. Troll #5 Flicker Shads to locate schools or use your electronics to find the schools and then anchor up and drop Bobby Garland Baby Shads and Trout Magnets or worms to the fish.
Pheasant hunting opens this Saturday – October 19th. Stop by the MarDon store for your shotgun shells, decoy weights and other hunting supplies.
Call the MarDon Tackle Store for the latest fishing info at 509-346-2651.

Pic1: Mike Meseberg shows a nice sand dunes Largemouth caught on a black spinnerbait!


Pic2: Joe and his pup enjoying some shore fishing for trout on Medicare Beach!

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Sport white sturgeon retention allowed for two days on the Columbia River.

Action: Allows a limited sturgeon retention fishery. White sturgeon from 44-inches minimum to 50-inches maximum fork length may be retained.

Effective dates: Saturday, Oct. 19 and Thursday, Oct. 24, 2019, only.

Species affected: White Sturgeon

Locations: Mainstem Columbia River from the Wauna powerlines upstream to Bonneville Dam and the Cowlitz River.

Reason for action: The legal-size population is large enough to allow for a conservative retention fishery within the lower Columbia River.

Additional information: Fork length is measured in a straight line from the tip of the nose to the fork in the caudal fin (tail) with the fish laying on its side on a flat surface, with the tape measure/ruler positioned flat under the fish.

Catch-and-release fishing for sturgeon will continue to be allowed on all non-retention days.

Daily white sturgeon limit: One fish

Annual white sturgeon limit: Two fish

Retention of green sturgeon is prohibited.

Information contact: Region 5 office; 360-696-6211.

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Potholes Reservoir/Mardon Resort

MarDon Fresh News – October 11, 2019
The current water level on the Potholes Reservoir is 1030.61 feet – down .23 feet from one week ago. The water temp remains around 54 degrees – but will be cooling further with the current cold snap With the water level where it is -continue to use extreme caution while boating between Goose Island and the face of the dam and the face of the sand dunes!
It continues to be a great time to fish the Potholes Reservoir if you want to catch a mixed bag! The fishing for most all species in the Reservoir is from good to outstanding as the fish react to the changing of the season.
The bass fishing continues to be very good! Fish the face of the sand dunes with a ½ oz. football head jig coupled with a hula grub, Senkos, Strike King KVD 5XD crankbaits, Tubes and Jerk Baits. Fish from 2 to 20 feet. The Smallmouth bass are being found on the face of the dam and on the rock piles around Goose Island – as well as on the face of the sand dunes. Fish Booyah finesse jigs, Wacky Rigged Senkos, Crankbaits, Tubes and DS Minnows for the Smallmouth.
The walleye fishing remains good. The lower water temps, cooler nights, and lower water are putting the walleye into a positive feeding mode. Fish the face of the sand dunes in front of the West Arm and Crab Creek in 5-30 feet of water. Start by trolling a #5 or a #7 Flicker Shad at 1.5-2.0 miles per hour on a long line. If this does not produce – switch to trolling a Slow Death Hook and a 2 oz. bottom walker and ½ a crawler in 8-15 feet. Troll from .8-1.2 miles per hour. ½ oz. Jig Blade Baits when you mark fish have been producing as well.
For trout – fish Medicare Beach to the Mouth of Crab Creek and in front of the State Park. Troll Gibbs Wee G Spoons, Wicked Lures Trout Killers, Needlefish spoons, #7 Flicker Shads and Shad Raps at 2.5 – 3.0 mph. Use leaded line with 3-colors out or troll with a 2 oz. banana sinker. Set the drag light as the average trout is 2-5 pounds and can break the line on the initial strike.
The Channel Cat and Bullhead fishing is still good – despite the falling water temperature. Fish the slightly deeper holes in around the mouth of Frenchman’s waterway, Crab Creek and Lind Coulee. Look for water in the 10-15-foot range. Use Catfish Magic Bait, Berkley Catfish Nuggets, Liver and worms on the bottom for both.
Bluegill and big crappie and a few Perch continue to be caught on the face of the dunes and in the mouth of Crab Creek. Troll #5 Flicker Shads to locate schools or use your electronics to find the schools and then anchor up and drop Bobby Garland Baby Shads and Trout Magnets or worms to the fish.
Duck and Goose hunting opens October 12th this year. Stop by the MarDon store for your shotgun shells, decoy weights and other hunting supplies.
Call the MarDon Tackle Store for the latest fishing info at 509-346-2651.

Walleye fishing continues to be very good.

Despite the falling water temps, Joni Nye caught this nice 10 pound Channel Catfish trolling for Walleye!

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Potholes Reservoir / Mardon Resort Fishing Report.

MarDon Fresh News – October 11, 2019
The current water level on the Potholes Reservoir is 1030.61 feet – down .23 feet from one week ago. The water temp remains around 54 degrees – but will be cooling further with the current cold snap With the water level where it is -continue to use extreme caution while boating between Goose Island and the face of the dam and the face of the sand dunes!
It continues to be a great time to fish the Potholes Reservoir if you want to catch a mixed bag! The fishing for most all species in the Reservoir is from good to outstanding as the fish react to the changing of the season.
The bass fishing continues to be very good! Fish the face of the sand dunes with a ½ oz. football head jig coupled with a hula grub, Senkos, Strike King KVD 5XD crankbaits, Tubes and Jerk Baits. Fish from 2 to 20 feet. The Smallmouth bass are being found on the face of the dam and on the rock piles around Goose Island – as well as on the face of the sand dunes. Fish Booyah finesse jigs, Wacky Rigged Senkos, Crankbaits, Tubes and DS Minnows for the Smallmouth.
The walleye fishing remains good. The lower water temps, cooler nights, and lower water are putting the walleye into a positive feeding mode. Fish the face of the sand dunes in front of the West Arm and Crab Creek in 5-30 feet of water. Start by trolling a #5 or a #7 Flicker Shad at 1.5-2.0 miles per hour on a long line. If this does not produce – switch to trolling a Slow Death Hook and a 2 oz. bottom walker and ½ a crawler in 8-15 feet. Troll from .8-1.2 miles per hour. ½ oz. Jig Blade Baits when you mark fish have been producing as well.
For trout – fish Medicare Beach to the Mouth of Crab Creek and in front of the State Park. Troll Gibbs Wee G Spoons, Wicked Lures Trout Killers, Needlefish spoons, #7 Flicker Shads and Shad Raps at 2.5 – 3.0 mph. Use leaded line with 3-colors out or troll with a 2 oz. banana sinker. Set the drag light as the average trout is 2-5 pounds and can break the line on the initial strike.
The Channel Cat and Bullhead fishing is still good – despite the falling water temperature. Fish the slightly deeper holes in around the mouth of Frenchman’s waterway, Crab Creek and Lind Coulee. Look for water in the 10-15-foot range. Use Catfish Magic Bait, Berkley Catfish Nuggets, Liver and worms on the bottom for both.
Bluegill and big crappie and a few Perch continue to be caught on the face of the dunes and in the mouth of Crab Creek. Troll #5 Flicker Shads to locate schools or use your electronics to find the schools and then anchor up and drop Bobby Garland Baby Shads and Trout Magnets or worms to the fish.
Duck and Goose hunting opens October 12th this year. Stop by the MarDon store for your shotgun shells, decoy weights and other hunting supplies.

Walleye fishing continues to produce strong catches right now on the Potholes Reservoir!

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Razor clamming open on entire Oregon coast.

Razor clams are legal to keep from the Washington state border to the California border.

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White sturgeon retention to open for 1 day on portion of Columbia River.

Action: Allows a limited sturgeon retention fishery. White sturgeon from 44 inches minimum to 50 inches maximum fork length may be retained.

Effective dates: Saturday, Oct. 12, 2019, only.

Species affected: White sturgeon.

Locations: Mainstem Columbia River from the Wauna powerlines upstream to Bonneville Dam, and the Cowlitz River.

Reason for action: The legal-size population is large enough to allow for a conservative recreational retention fishery within the lower Columbia River.

Additional information: Fork length is measured in a straight line from the tip of the nose to the fork in the caudal fin (tail) with the fish laying on its side on a flat surface, with the tape measure/ruler positioned flat under the fish.

Catch-and-release fishing for sturgeon will continue to be allowed on all non-retention days.

Daily white sturgeon limit: One fish

Annual white sturgeon limit: Two fish

Retention of green sturgeon is prohibited.

Information contact: Region 5 office; 360-696-6211.

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The Future of Columbia River Fishing?

Columbia River Fishing may not recognizable in two decades.

Columbia River fishing may not be recognizable in two decades.

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Update to Coos County Trout Plants.

amid an absolutely pathetic salmon season, several local waters are slated to receive trout plants; these waters are: 30 acre Bradley Lake south of Bandon which is slated to receive 800 trophy rainbows.; Upper Empire Lake – this 30 acre lake may also receive additional trout beyond the 2,000 that were intended for it. as well as additional trout intended for Lower Empire Lake. 50 acre Saunders will also be stocked with 1,300 trout – and if the water beneath the railroad trestle is too shallow, the planted trout may be trapped in the five or six acre western section of the lake.

The 600 trout planted in Butterfield Lake will not have access to the western section of the lake (west of the railroad tracks and will remain in the less than 20 acre main section of the lake.

Fishing will be difficult due to weedy low water at 30 acre Powers Pond, but the planted trout go on an intense right at dusk. The October plant will consist of 1,300 trophy rainbows.

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CDFW News – Paiute Cutthroat Trout Reintroduced to Native Habitat in High Sierra Wilderness.

California’s native Paiute cutthroat trout, the rarest trout in North America, swims once again in its high Sierra home waters for the first time in more than 100 years.

California Natural Resources Secretary Wade Crowfoot, California Department of Fish and Wildlife (CDFW) Director Charlton H. Bonham and representatives from the USDA Forest Service, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), Golden Gate Chapter of Trout Unlimited and Little Antelope Pack Station joined biologists to release 30 Paiute cutthroat trout of varying sizes into Silver King Creek in Alpine County, Calif., Sept. 18, 2019.

“You’ve got to celebrate good times. That’s what we’re doing here today,” said CDFW’s Bonham from the banks of Silver King Creek within the remote Carson-Iceberg Wilderness area of the Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest. “If you forget to celebrate, you’re overlooking a remarkable success story – bringing these fish back home and celebrating a better California.”

Not since the early 1900s have genetically pure Paiute cutthroat trout occupied the 11-mile stretch of Silver King Creek between Llewellyn Falls and Snodgrass Creek that represents almost the entirety of the fish’s historic range.

“This is a lifetime achievement for those working to recover the rarest trout in North America,” said Lee Ann Carranza, acting field supervisor for the USFWS Reno office. “This remarkable partnership has allowed Paiute cutthroat trout to be returned to their entire native range without threat from non-natives.”

The Paiute cutthroat trout was one of the first animals in the nation listed as endangered in 1967 under the federal Endangered Species Preservation Act of 1966, now known as the Endangered Species Act. In 1975, the species was downlisted to federally threatened to allow for a special rule that would facilitate management of the species by the State of California.

A small native range, habitat degraded by historic sheep and cattle grazing, and competition from and hybridization with non-native trout introduced into Silver King Creek threatened the species with extinction.

Only a fortuitous turn of events saved the species from disappearing altogether. In the early 1900s, Basque sheepherders moved some of the fish outside of their native range, upstream of Llewellyn Falls. The waterfalls served as a barrier to the non-native trout below and safeguarded a genetically pure population of Paiute cutthroat trout above the falls, providing government agencies and advocates the chance to recover the species in the future.

Efforts to save and restore the species have spanned several decades and involved removing non-native fish and restocking Paiute cutthroat trout from source populations. Recreational fishing was closed within the Silver King Creek drainage in 1934. Later, grazing allotments were administratively closed so habitat could be restored.

At one time, only two small tributaries above Llewellyn Falls held genetically pure Paiute cutthroat trout. CDFW, the Forest Service and USFWS transferred some of these fish to other fishless, protected streams within the Silver King Creek watershed as well as four watersheds outside of the basin to create additional refuge populations to stave off extinction.

The effort to reintroduce Paiute cutthroat trout back into their historic home – the 11-mile main reach of Silver King Creek – began in 1994 when CDFW biologists explored Silver King Canyon and identified a series of waterfalls that served as historic barriers to upstream fish migration, isolating the Paiute cutthroat trout. The barriers could once again insulate Paiute cutthroat trout from encroachment from non-native trout if the non-native trout in Silver King Creek could be removed.

Wildlife officials prevailed over a decade of legal challenges to treat Silver King Creek and its tributaries with rotenone, a natural fish poison, to eliminate non-native trout and prepare Silver King Creek for the eventual return of Paiute cutthroats.

Silver King Creek and its tributaries were chemically treated from 2013 to 2015. State and federal partners monitored the creek for three years following the treatment to make sure all non-native fish were removed. Wildfires, floods and drought over the decades further complicated recovery efforts.

“The commitment of Forest Service, CDFW, USFWS, Lahontan Regional Water Quality Control Board, Trout Unlimited Golden Gate Chapter and Little Antelope Pack Station to move this project forward in the face of numerous challenges has been incredible,” said Bill Dunkelberger, Humboldt-Toiyabe National Forest supervisor. “A project of this magnitude that took over several decades could not have been completed without state, federal and other partners working tirelessly together.”

The fish reintroduced into Silver King Creek on the afternoon of Sept. 18 were collected that morning from a source population in Coyote Valley Creek about 2 miles away and transported by mules to the banks of Silver King Creek. The fish were deposited into buckets filled with water from Silver King Creek to acclimate for several minutes before being released among cheers and applause – and a few tears – by biologists and others, some of whom have spent decades working toward the historic homecoming.

Restoring Paiute cutthroat trout to their native Silver King Creek nearly doubles the amount of habitat available to the fish and is considered key to their long-term survival and potential delisting.

Monitoring of the reintroduced fish and additional restocking of Paiute cutthroat trout into Silver King Creek from other refuge populations is planned in future years to aid genetic diversity and introduce different age classes into the creek to help natural reproduction.

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WDFW News – Several areas of Puget Sound reopening for late-season recreational crab fishing.

Several marine areas of Puget Sound will reopen for recreational crab fishing on Oct. 1, the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) announced.

The openings were approved by fishery managers after summer catch assessments by WDFW indicated additional crab are available for harvest during the late season.

Waters reopening to sport crabbing Oct. 1 include marine areas 4 (Neah Bay, east of the Bonilla-Tatoosh line), 5 (Sekiu), 6 (eastern Strait of Juan de Fuca), 7 (San Juan Islands), 8-1 (Deception Pass, Hope Island, and Skagit Bay), 8-2 (Port Susan and Port Gardiner), and 9 (Admiralty Inlet), except for waters south of a line from Olele Point to Foulweather Bluff.

In each area, crabbing will be allowed seven days a week through Dec. 31. Sport crabbers are reminded that setting or pulling traps from a vessel is only allowed from one hour before official sunrise through one hour after official sunset.

Sport crabbing will not reopen for winter in marine areas 10 (Seattle Bremerton), 11 (Vashon Island), and 13 (South Puget Sound). It is still uncertain whether portions of marine areas 9 (Port Gamble/Port Ludlow) and 12 (Hood Canal – North of Ayock Point) will open for a shortened winter season. WDFW expects to announce a decision in the future on whether these areas will reopen.

The daily limit in Puget Sound is five Dungeness crab, males only, in hard-shell condition with a minimum carapace width of 6 1/4 inches. Crabbers may also catch six red rock crab of either sex per day with a minimum carapace width of 5 inches, and six Tanner crab of either sex with a minimum carapace of 4 1/2 inches. Additional information is available on WDFW’s website at https://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfishing-regulations/crab .

You must have a Puget Sound Dungeness crab endorsement to harvest Dungeness crab from Puget Sound. All Dungeness crab caught in the late-season recreational fishery must be recorded immediately on winter catch record cards, which are valid through Dec. 31. Winter catch record cards are free to those with crab endorsements and are available at license vendors across the state.

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