Mardon Resort / Potholes Reservoir.

The current water level on the Potholes Reservoir is 1032.01 feet – down 1.33 feet from one week ago. The Reservoir is 2.91 feet higher than it was this day last year. The water temps in the sand dunes and on the main Reservoir are in the upper 70s to low 80s.
The bass fishing is outstanding! With the water level up almost three feet higher to the day compared to last year – bass anglers have the opportunity to fish spots back in the sand dunes that would not be accessible in a normal year. That said – the water is dropping – pulling baitfish and the bass to the face of the dunes and onto the habitat boxes and humps. This combination offers excellent bass fishing opportunities across a lot of real estate. Fish the sand dunes and Crab Creek with 3/8th oz. swim jigs, Senkos, Strike King KVD 2.5 Square Bill crankbaits, and SPRO frogs. As the water continues to drop – the outer dunes and the face of the dunes will continue to improve. Reports of bigger bass are coming in – being caught on the face of the sand dunes in 15-25 feet of water. The Smallmouth bass are being found on the face of the dam and on the rock piles around Goose Island – as well as in the sand dunes. Fish Booyah finesse jigs, Wacky Rigged Senkos, Crankbaits, Tubes and DS Minnows for the Smallmouth.
The walleye fishing is slowly improving as the water drops. Like the bass fishing – as the water drops – both baitfish and the walleye will move out of the dunes to the face and onto the humps. This provides walleye anglers with a better opportunity to connect and a more weed-free path to troll crankbaits. Fish the West Arm and Crab Creek in 6-20 feet of water. Troll the channels and weed lines in the sand dunes with a Slow Death Hook and a 2 oz. bottom walker and ½ a crawler in 8-15 feet. Troll from .8-1.2 miles per hour. Troll a #5 Flicker Shad or Rapala Shad Rap in the channels and next to the weed beds at 1.5 – 2.5 miles per hour. If the fish are not there – move to the face of the sand dunes using the same techniques.
No reports on trout fishing this week. If you do want to catch some nice Rainbows your best bet would be to fish in front of Medicare Beach to the Mouth of Crab Creek and in front of the State Park. Troll Wicked Lures Trout Killers, Needlefish spoons, #7 Flicker Shads and Shad Raps at 2.5 -3.0 mph. Set the drag light as the average trout is 2-5 pounds and can break the line on the initial strike.
The Channel Cat and Bullhead fishing remains to be extremely productive this week. Use Catfish Magic Bait, Berkley Catfish Nuggets, and worms on the bottom for both. Fish up Lind Coulee, the mouth of Frenchman’s Wasteway and in the sand dunes for Channel Cats and Bullhead.
Big Bluegill and big crappie are being caught on the face of the dunes and in the mouth of Crab Creek. Several reports of good crappie fishing in Lind Coulee have come in as well. Troll #5 Flicker Shads or locate schools, or use your electronics to find the schools and drop Bobby Garland Baby Shads and Trout Magnets to the fish. Perch are being caught in the mouth of Crab Creek and on the humps in front of the exposed dunes.
Call the MarDon Tackle Store for the latest fishing info at 509-346-2651.
Upcoming Events:
August 24th – Lake Poker Run – All day event – challenging game competition with payout. Food will be provided for the event. Call MarDon Resort for sign- up information.
August 31-Sept 2 – Labor Day Weekend

Annual guest of MarDon Resort – Collin Posner and family from Gold Bar caught a mixed bag this weekend of catfish, perch and this big 29” walleye weighing 9.0 pounds caught trolling a #5 Perch Rapala!<bJackson Purcell of Moses Lake with a 10” Bluegill caught on the Potholes Reservoir – lots of big Bluegill out there this year!

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Two (2) Fish Halibut Daily Bag Limit South of Cape Falcon.

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Halibut Daily Limit to increase to 2 starting August 23rd.

Anglers may keep two Pacific halibut per day in the sport halibut fisheries in the Central Oregon Coast and Southern Oregon Subareas (subareas south of Cape Falcon to the OR/CA Border), beginning Friday, August 23, 2019.

Primarily due to uncooperative weather for most of the spring and summer all-depth seasons, approximately 150,000 pounds of quota remain for the Central Coast and Southern Oregon subareas. Given the total amount of quota remaining ODFW, NMFS, and IPHC determined that this change can be made to allow for additional opportunity to harvest quota in these two subareas, as allowed under the flexible inseason management provision of the Halibut Catch Sharing Plan for the west coast.

Updates to the sport bottomfish fishery will be posted here: myodfw.com/pacific-halibut-sport-regulations

And to the Marine Recreational Report here: myodfw.com/recreation-report/fishing-report/marine-zone

Update to the Three Subareas (through August 11) Below.

Columbia River Subarea:

All-Depth—Closed for 2019. No quota remaining.

Nearshore—The nearshore fishery is open seven days per week. 281 pounds of quota remain.

Central Oregon Coast Subarea:

Spring All-Depth season— Closed for 2019. Quota remaining = 82,000 pounds.

Summer All-Depth Season—Open every Friday and Saturday until quota is met or Oct. 31. Quota remaining = 58,000 lbs. 2 fish bag limit effective Friday, Aug. 23.

Nearshore Season— Open seven days per week until quota is met or Oct. 31. Quota remaining = 23,000 lbs. 2 fish bag limit effective Friday, Aug. 23.

Reminder that on days when the all-depth fishery is also open, such as Aug. 23-24 & Aug. 30-31, the all-depth fishery regulations apply, regardless of what depth is fished. This means that most bottomfish species may not be retained when halibut are onboard the vessel.

South of Humbug Mountain subarea:

Open seven days per week until quota is met or Oct. 31. Quota remaining = 9,000 lbs. 2 fish bag limit effective Friday, Aug. 23.

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Pete Heley Outdoors 8 / 21 / 2019

Data regarding the current ocean selective(finclipped) coho season has been updated through August 11thth and 39.8 percent of the quota has been caught and kept with fishing success running at .74 retained salmon per angler/trip for the season.. The most successful port so far continues to be Depoe Bay with 1.01 kept salmon per angler trip.

Ocean salmon-fishing continued its gradual several week decline.with salmon-fishing success now down to .74 retained salmon per angler/trip. Newport continues to be the busiest port along the central Oregon coast. It’s 17891 angler/trips is nearly twice as many as any other port. Winchester Bay is second with 9,456 angler/trips and Garibaldi is third with 8,710 angler/trips.

The updated(through August 11th) resuls for all ten ports in our zone are: Garibaldi(8,710 angler/trips – .51 retained salmon per angler); Pacific City(4,726 angler/trips -.92 retained salmon per angler); Depoe Bay(6,626 angler trips – 1.01 retained salmon per angler); Newpor(17891 angler /trips – .90 retained salmon per angler); Florence(0 angler/trips); Brookings(3,267 angler/trips – ..28 retained salmon per angler); Gold Beach(177 angler/trips – .00 retained salmon per angler); Bandon(202 angler/trips – .47 retained salmon per angler): Charleston(2,065 angler/trips – .55 retained salmon per angler);Winchester Bay (9,456 angler trips – .62 retained salmon per angler.

As for chinook salmon catches, Newport leads with 1,196 followed by Winchester Bay Bay with 719 and Depoe Bay with 663.

With two weeks left in the season, 39.8 percent of the quota has been caught and kept and there is no chance that season quota will be met or even approached.

Portland-area salmon-fishing regulations that were loosened last year are more restrictive this year.

Second rod licenses will not be allowed on the Willamette River this year.

Barbed hooks will no longer be legal to use on the Columbia River this season.

As of August 16th, jetty anglers can, once again keep one cabezon measuring at least 16-inches per day. But as for boat anglers – it’s still catch and release.

Studies quoted in “The Columbia Basin Bulletin. have concluded that a major cause of hatchery salmonids straying in coastal streams is due to certain streams lacking distinctive odors. The gradual accidification of the ocean also appears to be an important factor regarding the straying of spawning salmonids.

A reminder that things could always get worse was the recent closing of every Mississippi beach due to toxic algae.

Unsubstantiated rumors of California halibut taken at multiple locations at Winchester Bay are still being repeated – but so far, remain unverified.

Striper fishing on the Smith River improved last week for bait anglers.

According to Loon Lake Lodge, the BLM Campground is still closed and isn’t slated to reopen until 2021. It’s closure has definitely affected boating and fishing pressure on different areas of the lake. Recreational usage is very heavy at the upper end of the lake near the old “Ducketts Dock”, but recreational usage in the middle and lower end of the lake is definitely greatly reduced.

Several Florence-area lakes are providing good early morning fishing for largemouth bass and yellow perch.

An inexpensive and easier way to move fish over dams and other obstructions has been developed by WHOOSHH. It’s definitely worth an internet search. – make sure you spell it right.

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Winchester Bay Bottomfishing.

long-leader boat limit.

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Winchester Bay Crabbing.

Winchester Bay crabbing is off the charts.

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Tenmile Lakes Largemouth Bass

11 year old Kayle Morris with a 4-pound largemouth he caught off Ringo’s Marina on South Tenmile Lake.

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Mardon Resort / Potholes Reservoir Fishing Report.

The current water level on the Potholes Reservoir is 1033.34 feet – down .66 feet from one week ago. The Reservoir is 3.05 feet higher than it was this day last year. The water temps the sand dunes are in the mid 80’s. The water temps on the main Reservoir are in the low 80’s. in
The bass fishing remains extremely good! Fish the sand dunes and Crab Creek with 3/8th oz. swim jigs, Senkos, Strike King KVD 2.5 Square Bill crankbaits, and SPRO frogs. As the water continues to drop – the outer dunes and the face of the dunes will continue to improve. Reports of bigger bass are coming in – being caught on the face of the sand dunes in 15-25 feet of water. The Smallmouth bass are being found on the face of the dam and on the rock piles around Goose Island – as well as in the sand dunes. Fish Booyah finesse jigs, Wacky Rigged Senkos, Crankbaits, Tubes and DS Minnows for the Smallmouth.
The walleye fishing continues to be fair to tough – with a slight improvement in numbers caught. The water level is now 3.05’ feet higher than it was this time last year. This provides plenty of water, weeds and feed back in the dunes. The walleye do not need to move out of the weed beds to eat. Run as close to the weeds as you can with either #5 Flicker Shads or Rapala Shad Raps. Fish the West Arm and Crab Creek in 6-20 feet of water. Troll the channels and weed lines with a Slow Death Hook and a 2 oz. bottom walker and ½ a crawler in 8-15 feet. Troll from .8-1.2 miles per hour. Troll a #5 Flicker Shad or Rapala Shad Rap in the channels and next to the weed beds at 1.5 – 2.5 miles per hour. Now is a good time to jig or drop-shot the weed-lines as well.
Best bet for trout is to fish in front of Medicare Beach to the Mouth of Crab Creek and in front of the State Park. Troll Wicked Lures Trout Killers, Needlefish spoons, #7 Flicker Shads and Shad Raps at 2.5 -3.0 mph. Set the drag light as the average trout is 2-5 pounds and can break the line on the initial strike.
The Channel Cat and Bullhead fishing remains to be extremely productive this week. Use Catfish Magic Bait, Berkley Catfish Nuggets, and worms on the bottom for both. Fish up Lind Coulee, the mouth of Frenchman’s Wasteway and in the sand dunes for Channel Cats and Bullhead.
The Crappie and Bluegill fishing continues to improve as the water level drops. Fish the mouth of Crab Creek, the face of the dunes, the channels in the dunes and up the Lind Coulee. Fish – Gulp Alive minnows, Trout Magnets, #5 Flicker Shads and Bobby Garland Baby Shads around the willows & weed-lines for Crappie, Bluegill. We have had a surprising uptick in reports of perch being caught – both quantity and quality. Most are caught by walleye anglers who locate them by trolling, then anchor up and fish worms.
Call the MarDon Tackle Store for the latest fishing info at 509-346-2651.

Mark Mrzena of the Puyallup Hawg Hunters Bass Club with a 7.05 pound Potholes Reservoir Largemouth!

MarDon Resort owner Mike Meseberg with a beautiful Potholes Reservoir Walleye caught on a Berkley War Pig!

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Pete Heley Outdoors 8 / 14 / 2019

Data regarding the current ocean selective(finclipped) coho season has been updated through July 28th and 35.3 percent of the quota has been caught and kept with fishing success running at .83 retained salmon per angler/trip. The most successful port so far continues to be Depoe Bay with 1.10 kept salmon per angler trip. with

Ocean salmon-fishing success dropped off somewhat last week to .78 retained salmon per angler/trip. Newport continues to be the busiest port along the central Oregon coast. It’s 15,802 anglertrips is more than twice as many as any other port. Winchester Bay is second with 7, 7672 angler/trips and Garibaldi is third with 7,440 angler/trips.

The updated(through August 4th) resuls for all ten ports in our zone are: Garibaldi(7,440 angler/trips – .52 retained salmon per angler); Pacific City(4,297 angler/trips -.92 retained salmon per angler); Depoe Bay(5,925 angler trips – 1.09 retained salmon per angler); Newpor(15,802 angler trips – .93 retained salmon per angler); Florence(0 angler/trips); Brookings(3,113 angler/trips – ..29 retained salmon per angler); Gold Beach(129 angler/trips – .00 retained salmon per angler); Bandon(166 angler/trips – .49 retained salmon per angler): Charleston(1,964 angler/trips – .56 retained salmon per angler);Winchester Bay (7,673 angler trips – .70 retained salmon per angler.

As for chinook salmon catches, Newport leads with 1,160 followed by Depoe Bay with 663 and Winchester Bay with 642.

With two weeks left in the season, 36.5 percent of the quota has been caught and kept.

Portland-area fishing regulations that were loosened last year are more restrictive this year.

Second rod licenses will not be allowed on the Willamette River this year.

Barbed hooks will no longer be legal to use on the Columbia River this season.

Retention of cabezon will be prohibited for all boat-based anglers beginning 12:01 a.m. on Friday, August 16.

If you want to feel better about most salmon-return surveys just compare them to the return of Snake River sockeye salmon – which is the lowest in a decade and only six percent of the ten year average.

Recent studies have concluded that a major cause of hatchery salmonids straying in coastal streams is due to certain streams lacking distinctive odors.

The emergency fishing restrictions on the Umpqua River are still in effect. The upper limit is the boat ramp at River Forks Park. The lower limit is the Scottsburg Bridge.

Fishing is prohibited within 200 feet of any tributary streams – or within 200 feet of the Umpqua River on any such tributaries.

One area of confusion involves Mill Creek, which despite being completely closed to angling. is below the lower limit of the emergency restrictions. The confusing part is whether, or not anglers can fish the mainstem Umpqua River within 200 feet of the mouth of Mill Creek.

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Request for voluntary avoidance of copper, quillback, and china rockfish in the recreational bottomfish fishery.

ODFW requests angler cooperation in reducing catch of copper, quillback, and china rockfish by not targeting them. Retention of these species remains legal at this time, however, anglers are encouraged to release them if they are not injured.

ODFW is making this request because the 2019 recreational harvest guideline for these species has been reached. No inseason regulatory action is being taken at this time because enough pounds remain unused in other fisheries coastwide. It may become necessary to prohibit retention of these three species at some point, for the remainder of 2019. Reducing catch through voluntary measures can help postpone this possibility.

Black rockfish are the most common species in recreational bottomfish catches. In 2019, overall catch is lower than anticipated, and there is no danger of reaching the quota for black rockfish, which would cause the entire bottomfish fishery to close.

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